The Truth by Paul Davies

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Synopsis

The Truth is the story of an uneasy detente, the persistence of one man's awkward rapport with fate. The kind of fiction that's so strange it could be somebody's biography: it hurts, haunts, and laughs, and who knows, it just might even be true.
 

About Paul Davies

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Paul Davies is an internationally acclaimed physicist, writer and broadcaster. He received degrees in physics from University College, London. He was Professor of Natural Philosophy in the Australian Centre for Astrobiology at Macquarie University, Sydney and has held previous academic appointments at the Universities of Cambridge, London, Newcastle upon Tyne and Adelaide. Most of his research has been in the area of quantum field theory in curved spacetime. Davies has also has written many books for the general reader in the fascinating fields of cosmology and physics. He is the author of over twenty-five books, including The Mind of God, Other Worlds, God and the New Physics, The Edge of Infinity, The Cosmic Blueprint, Are We Alone?, The Fifth Miracle, The Last Three Minutes, About Time, and How to Build a Time Machine. His awards include an Advance Australia Award for outstanding contributions to science, two Eureka Prizes, the 2001 Kelvin Medal and Prize by the Institute of Physics, and the 2002 Faraday Prize by The Royal Society for Progress in religion. He also received the Templeton Prize for his contributions to the deeper implications of science. In April 1999 the asteroid 1992 OG was officially named (6870) Pauldavies in his honour.
 
Published September 25, 1999 by Insomniac Press. 208 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Truth

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A viper injects poison into a mouse, a bombardier beetle “sprays boiling toxic liquid out of its rear end,” and a crocodile devours a bespectacled zebra (“The crocodile then performs the so-called ‘death roll,’ clamping its jaws around a body part—such as a head or leg—and spinning ...

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Publishers Weekly

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Davies's hero, a modern-day hybrid of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza, jousts at scores of life's windmills, but he pokes fun at himself along the way, almost always avoiding the spiritual sponginess that is the hazard of the book's theme.

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Socialist Review

In his new book, Flat Earth News, award-winning journalist Nick Davies argues that the main threat to truth-telling journalism has moved from propagandist proprietors such as Lord Beaverbrook to the corporations and their commercial interests exemplified by business magnate Rupert Murdoch.

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