The Violence of Peace by Stephen Carter
America's Wars in the Age of Obama

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Synopsis

"The man who many considered the peace candidate in the last election was transformed into a war president," writes bestselling author and leading academic Stephen l. Carter in The Violence of Peace, his new book decoding what President Barack Obama's views on war mean for America and its role in military conflict, now and going forward. As America winds down a war in Iraq, ratchets up another in Afghanistan, and continues a global war on terrorism, Carter delves into the implications of the military philosophy Obama has adopted through his first two years in office. Responding to the invitation that Obama himself issued in his Nobel address, Carter uses the tools of the Western tradition of just and unjust war to evaluate Obama's actions and words about military conflict, offering insight into how the president will handle existing and future wars, and into how his judgment will shape America's fate. Carter also explores war as a way to defend others from tyrannical regimes, which Obama has endorsed but not yet tested, and reveals the surprising ways in which some of the tactics Obama has used or authorized are more extreme than those of his predecessor, George W. Bush. "Keeping the nation at peace," Carter writes, "often requires battle," and this book lays bare exactly how America's wars in Afghanistan and Iraq are shaping the way Obama views the country's role in conflict and peace, ultimately determining the fate of the nation.
 

About Stephen Carter

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Stephen L. Carter is the William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law at Yale, where he has taught for almost thirty years. He is the author of four bestselling novels, including The Emperor of Ocean Park (2002), and seven acclaimed works of nonfiction. Among his nonfiction books are The Culture of Disbelief: How American Law and Politics Trivialize Religious Devotion (1993); Civility: Manners, Morals and the Etiquette of Democracy (1998); and God's Name in Vain: The Wrongs and Rights of Religion in Politics (2000). He lives with his family in Connecticut.
 
Published January 11, 2011 by Beast Books. 282 pages
Genres: Political & Social Sciences, War, Young Adult, Law & Philosophy, History, Professional & Technical, Education & Reference. Non-fiction

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Kirkus Reviews

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The author provides lucid commentary on the complexities of jus in bello theories, and he seems to be a realist: America has real enemies in the world, against whom real opposition is wanted.

Jan 11 2011 | Read Full Review of The Violence of Peace: Americ...

The New York Times

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Carter points out that in his Nobel speech, Obama argued that America cannot “insist that others follow the rules of the road if we refuse to follow them ourselves.” But, Carter writes, “the president’s actions do not bear this out.” The Obama administration has arrogated to itself the right to e...

Jan 28 2011 | Read Full Review of The Violence of Peace: Americ...

Publishers Weekly

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Distinguished Yale Law professor and bestselling author Carter (The Emperor of Ocean Park) examines Obama's words (particularly his invocation of the "just war tradition" during his Nobel Peace prize acceptance speech, the full text of which is included here) and actions in order to determine his...

Jan 10 2011 | Read Full Review of The Violence of Peace: Americ...

Bookmarks Magazine

Responding to the invitation that Obama himself issued in his Nobel address, Carter uses the tools of the Western tradition of just and unjust war to evaluate Obama's actions and words about military conflict, offering insight into how the president will handle existing and future wars, and into ...

Jan 31 2011 | Read Full Review of The Violence of Peace: Americ...

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