The Wagon by Tony Johnston

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Synopsis

One Carolina morning a child is born into slavery. He grows and is soon working for the Master from dawn to dark. And as he grows, he dreams that the wagon he's helped build for Master is a glorious chariot of freedom. "Ransome's paintings give life to the characters and bring out the luster of the surroundings; the story is ardent and somber, a piercing lament."--Kirkus Reviews.

"Gnarled, emotive oil paintings powerfully illustrate the boyhood of the narrator." --The New York Times, Ten Best Illustrated Children's Books of the Year.

"Speaks to the heart, affording readers an intimate, affecting look at a pivotal time in American history." --Publishers Weekly

 

About Tony Johnston

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Tony Johnston was born January 30, 1942, in Los Angeles, CA. After attending Stanford University where she earned a B.A. in History and an M.A in Education, she became a fourth-grade teacher. She has written over seventy books for children. Her titles include Amber on the Mountain, the Cowboy and the Black-Eyed Pea, Day of the Dead, the Ghost of Nicholas Greebe, the Sparky and Eddie series, and the Adventures of Mole and Troll. Her first adult novel was Any Small Goodness. Her works have earned her several awards including a Children's Choice Award for Four Scary Stories and the Beatty Award in 2002 for Any Small Goodness. James Ransome has illustrated more than 35 books for children, including many award winners. He lives in Rhinebeck, New York, with his wife, children's book author?Lesa Cline Ransome, and their four children. Visit his website at www.jamesransome.com.
 
Published September 1, 1996 by Tambourine. 40 pages
Genres: Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Wagon

Kirkus Reviews

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The boy's father, a carpenter and mule driver, builds ""a good wagon of smooth, dark wood"" for the casually cruel master and eventually, with mules Swing and Low, the wagon becomes their chariot bearing the family away to freedom following the war and Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation.

Sep 01 1996 | Read Full Review of The Wagon

Kirkus Reviews

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The boy's father, a carpenter and mule driver, builds ``a good wagon of smooth, dark wood'' for the casually cruel master and eventually, with mules Swing and Low, the wagon becomes their chariot bearing the family away to freedom following the war and Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation.

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Publishers Weekly

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This beautifully constructed story about a boy born into slavery and freed after the Civil War gives readers an intimate, affecting look at a pivotal time in American history, said PW. Ages 5-

Jan 04 1999 | Read Full Review of The Wagon

Publishers Weekly

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This beautifully constructed story about a boy born into slavery and freed after the Civil War gives readers an intimate, affecting look at a pivotal time in American history, said PW. Ages 5-

Jan 04 1999 | Read Full Review of The Wagon

Publishers Weekly

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built by the skilled hands of the boy's father, it represents freedom, like the sweet chariot of the hymn the family sings, ""Swing Low."" In the end, with the Civil War over and emancipation finally achieved, the wagon carries the family to a new life.

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