The Way We Live Now by Anthony Trollope

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 3 Critic Reviews



Widely acknowledged to be the masterpiece of Trollope's prolific Victorian career, "The Way We Live Now" is the scathing satire he wrote upon returning to England after traveling abroad. In seeking to discuss the deceit and dissipation he found, Trollope spared no iniquitous aspect he perceived in business, politics, social classes, literature, and various vice-related activities. The result of his efforts is an impressive array of characters, such as the old coquette Lady Carbury, her dissolute son Sir Felix, a spoiled and treacherously lovely heiress Marie, and her colossal figure of a father Augustus Melmotte, the great financier whose deceptive plots dupe countless wealthy individuals. Through the swindling, bribery, feuding, and shameless self-promotion of these characters, Trollope writes a sweeping panorama of vice for the sake of monetary greed that will cause readers to reflect on the morality of our own time.

About Anthony Trollope

See more books from this Author
Anthony Trollope, 1815-1885 Novelist Anthony Trollope was born the fourth son of Thomas Anthony Trollope, a barrister, and Frances Trollope in London, England. At the age of one, he was taken to a house called Julians. He attended many famous schools but as a large, awkward boy, he never felt in place among the aristocrats he met there. In 1835, his father Thomas Anthony died. In 1834, he became a junior clerk in the General Post Office, London. He spent seven years there in poverty until his transfer, in 1841, to Banagher, Ireland as a deputy postal surveyor. He became more financially secure and in 1844, he married Rose Heseltine. Trollope wanted to discover the reasons for Irish discontent. In 1843, he began working on his first novel "The Macdermots of Ballycloran" which was published in 1847. He was sent on many postal missions. He spent a year is Belfast, in 1853, then went to Donnybrook, near Dublin. He also went to Egypt, Scotland and the West Indies to finally settle outside of London, at Waltham Cross, as a surveyor general in the Post Office. At this point, he was writing constantly. Some of the writings during this time were "The Noble Jilt" (written in 1850), a comedy that was set aside; "Barchester Towers" (1857), which chronicled the events and politics in the imaginary city; and "The Last Chronicle of Barset." In 1867, he tried editorship of St. Paul's Magazine but soon gave up because he didn't feel suited for the job. In 1871, he went on a visit to a son in Australia. At sea, he wrote "Lady Anna" on the voyage out and "Australia and New Zealand" on the voyage back. The "Autobiography" was written between October 1875 and April 1876 but was not published until after his death. Suffering from asthma and possible angina pectoris, Trollope moved to Harting Grange. He wrote three more novels during 1881 than, in 1882, went to Ireland to begin research for "The Landleaguers". In November that year, he suffered a paralytic stroke and on December 6, 1882, he died. His wife and two sons survived him.
Published April 28, 1994 by Penguin. 685 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, History, Mystery, Thriller & Suspense, Humor & Entertainment, Political & Social Sciences, Action & Adventure, Crime. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Way We Live Now

The Independent

This, his great dark novel, begins as pure satire on literary life (Lady Carbury wants to write not good books, but ones that are said to be so), on the kind of credit-based greed that is especially evident in our own time, and on the perpetual struggle between what is honest, loving and kind in ...

May 01 2009 | Read Full Review of The Way We Live Now

A Patchwork of Books

Are you a book Publisher?Learn about Widgets now!.

Apr 01 1995 | Read Full Review of The Way We Live Now

JACKSON HOLE, WYO - Music In The Hole!

Jan 09 2013 | Read Full Review of The Way We Live Now

Reader Rating for The Way We Live Now

An aggregated and normalized score based on 122 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes

Rate this book!

Add Review