The Way We Never Were by Stephanie Coontz
American Families And The Nostalgia Trap

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Synopsis

The Way We Never Were examines two centuries of American family life and shatters a series of myths and half-truths that burden modern families. Placing current family dilemmas in the context of far-
 

About Stephanie Coontz

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Stephanie Coontz is a member of the faculty of Evergreen State College in Olympia, WA, where she is a historian and an expert on American culture.
 
Published August 6, 2008 by Basic Books. 432 pages
Genres: History, Political & Social Sciences, Parenting & Relationships. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Way We Never Were

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Placing the American family in its historical, cultural, economic, and philosophic context, Coontz (co-ed., Women's Work, Men's Property, 1986) identifies the myths—and their sources, functions, and fallacies—that Americans generate around family life, as well as the terrible burden t...

Oct 15 1992 | Read Full Review of The Way We Never Were: Americ...

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A historian of the American family debunks the myth that a return to the so-called traditional two-parent nuclear family can provide us with an unassailable refuge from the social, economic, and psychological stresses Americans seem to feel so acutely these days.

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Placing the American family in its historical, cultural, economic, and philosophic context, Coontz (co-ed., Women's Work, Men's Property, 1986) identifies the myths--and their sources, functions, and fallacies--that Americans generate around family life, as well as the terrible burden these illus...

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Publishers Weekly

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The golden age of the American family never existed, asserts Coontz ( The Social Origns of Private Life ) in a wonderfully perceptive, myth-debunking report. The ``Leave It to Beaver'' ideal of breadw

Nov 02 1992 | Read Full Review of The Way We Never Were: Americ...

Publishers Weekly

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Single-parent families cannot be considered abnormal anymore, and divorce is not an excuse for problem children: ""A mother's educational background has more effect on her child's welfare than her marital status."" One of the author's strongest arguments is that by blaming the ills of society on ...

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Publishers Weekly

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The golden age of the American family never existed, asserts Coontz ( The Social Origns of Private Life ) in a wonderfully perceptive, myth-debunking report. The ``Leave It to Beaver'' ideal of breadw

Nov 02 1992 | Read Full Review of The Way We Never Were: Americ...

Los Angeles Times

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(Incidentally, the highest rate of teen-age childbearing in 20th-Century America was in 1957.) "Children do best," Coontz concludes, "in societies where child-rearing is considered too important to be left entirely to parents."

Oct 23 1992 | Read Full Review of The Way We Never Were: Americ...

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