The Weight of Paradise by Iman Humaydan

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The end is rushed. Still, Humaydan writes incisively about her characters and their fears, frustrations, and, most importantly, their hopes. Humaydan’s newest novel is an engaging, if sometimes-clunky, portrait of life in one battered corner of the Middle East.
-Kirkus

Synopsis

Story of two women set against a post-war backdrop of 1990s Beirut.


While making a documentary film about the reconstruction of downtown Beirut, Maya Amer stumbles upon a battered leather suitcase that will change her life forever. Inside it she finds letters, photographs, a diary, and an envelope labeled: Letters from Istanbul.


The Weight of Paradise is both the story of Maya and her discovery, and also the story of the owner of these papers, Noura Abu Sawwan, a journalist who fled Syria just before the Lebanese civil war to find greater freedom of expression. A multi-voiced, multi-genre narration, it interweaves the stories of these two women and the people who surround them within the fabric of Beirut in the civil war and its immediate aftermath. A love story as well as a story of women s liberation and political freedom, the novel is also the tale of a city and country torn apart by repression, occupation, and war.



Wild Mulberries and B as in Beirut are not to be missed.


--Journal of Middle East Women's Studies

 

About Iman Humaydan

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Published August 10, 2016 by Interlink Pub Group. 244 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction
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Kirkus

Below average
on Sep 07 2016

The end is rushed. Still, Humaydan writes incisively about her characters and their fears, frustrations, and, most importantly, their hopes. Humaydan’s newest novel is an engaging, if sometimes-clunky, portrait of life in one battered corner of the Middle East.

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