The Wet and the Dry by Lawrence Osborne

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 4 Critic Reviews

One may question the wisdom or even sanity of some of the passages, as we may question the wisdom or sanity, or even manners, of going to Islamabad "in order to try and get drunk there", but you can't deny his journey is an entertaining one.
-Guardian

Synopsis

Selected as a Top Ten Book of the Year by Dwight Garner, New York Times

A “fearlessly honest account” (Financial Times) of man’s love of drink, and an insightful meditation on the meaning of alcohol consumption across cultures worldwide
 
Drinking alcohol: a beloved tradition, a dangerous addiction, even “a sickness of the soul” (as once described by a group of young Muslim men in Bali). In his wide-ranging travels, Lawrence Osborne—a veritable connoisseur himself—has witnessed opposing views of alcohol across cultures worldwide, compelling him to wonder: is drinking alcohol a sign of civilization and sanity, or the very reverse? Where do societies fall on the spectrum between indulgence and restraint? 
  
An immersing, controversial, and often irreverent travel narrative, The Wet and the Dry offers provocative, sometimes unsettling insights into the deeply embedded conflicts between East and West, and the surprising influence of drinking on the contemporary world today.

Now with an excerpt from Lawrence Osborne's latest novel, The Ballad of a Small Player.
 

About Lawrence Osborne

See more books from this Author
Journalist, short story writer, and novelist, Lawrence Osborne is the author of one previous novel and six books of nonfiction. His short story "Volcano" was selected for Best American Short Stories 2012, and he has written for the New York Times Magazine, the New Yorker, Forbes, Harper's, and other publications.
 
Published July 23, 2013 by Broadway Books. 242 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Education & Reference, Travel, Cooking, Political & Social Sciences. Non-fiction
Add Critic Review

Critic reviews for The Wet and the Dry
All: 4 | Positive: 4 | Negative: 0

NY Times

Good
Reviewed by Dwight Garner on Jul 23 2013

Mr. Osborne comes across in “The Wet and the Dry” as a real human being indeed — a complicated man mixing complicated feelings into fizzy, adult, intoxicating prose.

Read Full Review of The Wet and the Dry | See more reviews from NY Times

Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Nicholas Lezard on Mar 24 2013

One may question the wisdom or even sanity of some of the passages, as we may question the wisdom or sanity, or even manners, of going to Islamabad "in order to try and get drunk there", but you can't deny his journey is an entertaining one.

Read Full Review of The Wet and the Dry | See more reviews from Guardian

Kirkus

Good
on May 13 2013

For tipplers or teetotalers, an extended essay on drink in some precincts where it is welcome and others where it is criminal—rakish, rich and nicely served.

Read Full Review of The Wet and the Dry | See more reviews from Kirkus

LA Times

Above average
Reviewed by David L. Ulin on Jul 26 2013

All of this gives context to the drinking, making it a matter of philosophical, as opposed to hedonistic, choice. Certainly, Osborne likes his alcohol — he writes knowledgeably and passionately about gin, Scotch, vodka the history of bars — and he makes no excuses for his delight.

Read Full Review of The Wet and the Dry | See more reviews from LA Times

Reader Rating for The Wet and the Dry
72%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 80 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×