The Whistleblower by Kathryn Bolkovac
Sex Trafficking, Military Contractors, and One Woman's Fight for Justice

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Synopsis

When Nebraska police officer and divorced mother of three Kathryn Bolkovac saw a recruiting announcement for private military contractor DynCorp International, she applied and was hired. Good money, world travel, and the chance to help rebuild a war-torn country sounded like the perfect job. Bolkovac was shipped out to Bosnia, where DynCorp had been contracted to support the UN peacekeeping mission. She was assigned as a human rights investigator, heading the gender affairs unit. The lack of proper training provided sounded the first alarm bell, but once she arrived in Sarajevo, she found out that things were a lot worse. At great risk to her personal safety, she began to unravel the ugly truth about officers involved in human trafficking and forced prostitution and their connections to private mercenary contractors, the UN, and the U.S. State Department. After bringing this evidence to light, Bolkovac was demoted, felt threatened with bodily harm, was fired, and ultimately forced to flee the country under cover of darkness--bringing the incriminating documents with her. Thanks to the evidence she collected, she won a lawsuit against DynCorp, finally exposing them for what they had done. This is her story and the story of the women she helped achieve justice for.

 

About Kathryn Bolkovac

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Kathryn Bolkovac is a former police investigator from Nebraska who served as an International Police Task Force human rights investigator in Bosnia. She cooperated with Human Rights Watch to expose the misconduct and human rights abuses committed against young girls, forced into prostitution and used as sex slaves by U.S. military contractors such as DynCorp and other UN-related police and international organizations. She lives in Lincoln, Nebraska, and Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Cari Lynn is the author of three books of narrative nonfiction, including Leg the Spread: A Woman's Adventures Inside the Trillion-Dollar Boys Club of Commodities Trading. Lynn has written for numerous magazines and newspapers including O, Health, Good Housekeeping, and the Chicago Tribune. She lives in Los Angeles, CA.
 
Published January 4, 2011 by Palgrave Macmillan Trade. 257 pages
Genres: Political & Social Sciences, Biographies & Memoirs, Law & Philosophy, History, Travel. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The Whistleblower

Kirkus Reviews

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Though much of the action involves bureaucratic infighting, Bolkovac and co-author Lynn (Leg the Spread: A Woman’s Adventures Inside the Trillion-Dollar Boys’ Club of Commodities Trading, 2004, etc.) successfully evoke the paranoid atmosphere of a suspense film;

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The Washington Times

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The movie isn’t quite pure essay, but it’s telling that one of the climactic moments consists of the writing (and reading aloud) of an overly poetic memo about the horrors of human trafficking.

Aug 11 2011 | Read Full Review of The Whistleblower: Sex Traffi...

AV Club

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It takes an anticlimactic, all-too-honest ending to serve as a stinging reminder that in the real world, justice doesn’t come easy, and sometimes doesn’t come at all.

Aug 04 2011 | Read Full Review of The Whistleblower: Sex Traffi...

Entertainment Weekly

Any somber Canadian art thriller that's called The Whistleblower leads you to expect a number of things: It will be about hidden crimes, it will showcase corruption in high places, it will feature a protagonist who puts him or herself at risk by dragging the crimes (and the cover-up) into the light.

Aug 04 2011 | Read Full Review of The Whistleblower: Sex Traffi...

The Washington Post

In a movie that's brave enough to use Bolkovac's real name, and that uses the real name of Bolkovac's mentor at the United Nations, Madeleine Rees (played by Redgrave), that just seems cowardly.

Aug 12 2011 | Read Full Review of The Whistleblower: Sex Traffi...

The Telegraph

The statistics have the power to move and paralyse the viewer but the film teeters an uneasy balance between fact and fiction: hand-held camera work enhances the authenticity but the screenplay too often stumbles into melodrama, and the unsavoury male villains are reduced to snarly ca...

Jan 16 2012 | Read Full Review of The Whistleblower: Sex Traffi...

Christian Science Monitor

In the 1970s, both in America and overseas, socially conscious thrillers were an accepted movie genre.

Aug 05 2011 | Read Full Review of The Whistleblower: Sex Traffi...

Boston.com

Human trafficking in postwar Bosnia is the grim subject of “The Whistleblower,’’ a topical political thriller based on true events that’s anchored by a compelling performance from Rachel Weisz.

Sep 02 2011 | Read Full Review of The Whistleblower: Sex Traffi...

Spirituality & Practice

The Whistleblower makes a convincing case against this scourge but the most vivid expose is the massive corruption of the international corporation that runs the peacekeeping operation in Bosnia, making millions of dollars in continuing contracts.

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Time Magazine

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Weisz plays Kathryn Bolkovac, who arrived in Bosnia in 1999 and discovered that other U.N.

Aug 04 2011 | Read Full Review of The Whistleblower: Sex Traffi...

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