The White Man's Burden by William Easterly
Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good

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Synopsis

From one of the world’s best-known development economists—an excoriating attack on the tragic hubris of the West’s efforts to improve the lot of the so-called developing world In his previous book, The Elusive Quest for Growth, William Easterly criticized the utter ineffectiveness of Western organizations to mitigate global poverty, and he was promptly fired by his then-employer, the World Bank. The White Man’s Burden is his widely anticipated counterpunch—a brilliant and blistering indictment of the West’s economic policies for the world’s poor. Sometimes angry, sometimes irreverent, but always clear-eyed and rigorous, Easterly argues that we in the West need to face our own history of ineptitude and draw the proper conclusions, especially at a time when the question of our ability to transplant Western institutions has become one of the most pressing issues we face.




 

About William Easterly

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William Easterly was a senior economist at the World Bank for more than sixteen years and has worked in many areas of the developing world. He is a professor of economics at New York University.
 
Published March 16, 2006 by Penguin Books. 449 pages
Genres: Business & Economics, Political & Social Sciences, Education & Reference. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for The White Man's Burden

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More useful, Easterly writes, are top-down incentives to nurture good governments and isolate bad ones (although, as he notes, “aid shifts money from being spent by the best governments in the world to being spent by the worst”), while encouraging aid clients to develop social norms against crime...

Jan 15 2006 | Read Full Review of The White Man's Burden: Why t...

The New York Times

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The West has spent trillions to help poor countries, with little success. William Easterly thinks he knows why.

Mar 19 2006 | Read Full Review of The White Man's Burden: Why t...

The Guardian

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The Lion and the Unicorn: Gladstone vs Disraeli, by Richard Aldous (Pimlico, £12.99) In 1852, a new theatre opened in London, "a palace of Gothic enchantment" in which two of this country's greatest political actors, William Gladstone and Benjamin Disraeli, weaved their magic.

Nov 17 2007 | Read Full Review of The White Man's Burden: Why t...

Kirkus Reviews

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Easterly's is not the only recent portrayal of humanitarianism in crisis (see David Rieff's A Bed for the Night, 2002), but it is unusual in suggesting solutions as well.

Mar 20 2006 | Read Full Review of The White Man's Burden: Why t...

The New York Review of Books

To Professor Sachs, African poverty is just a technical problem that “the world’s leading practitioners” can solve (as described in the thousands of pages produced by Sachs’s UN Millennium Project) if only these experts are given enough money for their “proven strategies.” This reveals a remarkab...

Jan 11 2007 | Read Full Review of The White Man's Burden: Why t...

Stanford Social Innovation Review

I should admit that, before turning even one page of William Easterly’s book, I was predisposed to like it.

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