The Wounds of Nations by Linnie Blake

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His style has brio and wit, but is also infected by the hyper-academic absurdities of Fiske and Tulloch.
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Synopsis

The wounds of nations explores the ways in which horror films allows international audiences to deal with the horrors of recent history - from genocide to terrorist outrage, nuclear war to radical political change. Far from being mere escapism or titillation, it shows how horror (whether it be from 1970s America, 1980s Germany, post-Thatcherite Britain or post-9/11 America) is in fact a highly political and potentially therapeutic film genre that enables us to explore, and potentially recover from, the terrors of life in the real world.

Exploring a wide range of stylistically distinctive and generically diverse film texts, Blake proffers a radical critique of the nation-state and the ideologies of identity it promulgates, showing that horror cinema can offer us a disturbing, yet perversely life affirming, means of working through the traumatic legacy of recent times.
 

About Linnie Blake

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Linnie Blake is Senior Lecturer in Film, Manchester Metropolitan University.
 
Published July 19, 2013 by Manchester University Press. 233 pages
Genres: Education & Reference, Political & Social Sciences, Humor & Entertainment, Arts & Photography, Literature & Fiction, Horror. Non-fiction
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Excellent
Reviewed by Barry Baldwin on Jun 29 2012

His style has brio and wit, but is also infected by the hyper-academic absurdities of Fiske and Tulloch.

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