The XX Factor by Alison Wolf

60%

7 Critic Reviews

Overall while this is an interesting and provocative analysis Ms. Wolf tends to overemphasize the previous sisterly solidarity for which there is little evidence and portrays the current sisterly differences too starkly...
-NY Journal of Books

Synopsis

Noted British academic and journalist Alison Wolf offers a surprising and thoughtful study of the professional elite, and  examines the causes—and limits—of women’s rise and the consequences of their difficult choices.

The gender gap is closing. Today, for the first time in history, tens of millions of women are spending more time at the boardroom table than the kitchen table. These professional women are highly ambitious and highly educated, enjoying the same lifestyle prerogatives as their male counterparts. They are working longer and marrying later—if they marry at all. They are heading Fortune 500 companies and appearing on the covers of Forbes and Businessweek. They represent a special type of working woman—the kind who doesn’t just punch a clock for a paycheck, but derives self-worth and pleasure from wielding professional power.

At the same time that the gender gap is narrowing, the gulf is widening among women themselves. While blockbuster books such as Lean In focus only on women in high pressure jobs, in reality there are four women in traditionally female roles for every Sheryl Sandberg. In this revealing and deeply intelligent book, Alison Wolf examines why more educated women work longer hours, why having children early is a good idea, and how feminism created a less equal world. Her ideas are sure to provoke and surprise, as she challenges much of what the liberal and conservative media consider to be women’s best interests.
 

About Alison Wolf

See more books from this Author
ALISON WOLF CBE is a British economist and the director of Public Services Policy and Management at King's College, London. She is the author of Does Education Matter?: Myths About Education and Economic Growth.
 
Published October 1, 2013 by Crown. 416 pages
Genres: Business & Economics, Political & Social Sciences. Non-fiction
Add Critic Review

Critic reviews for The XX Factor
All: 7 | Positive: 3 | Negative: 4

Kirkus

Good
Reviewed by Kirkus Reviews on Aug 03 2013

An exploration of the unforeseen consequences attached to women’s liberation. [...] Solid research and intriguing patterns make for a worthy, if sometimes difficult read.

Read Full Review of The XX Factor | See more reviews from Kirkus

NY Times

Good
Reviewed by Katrin Bennhold on Oct 04 2013

Wolf’s book is a sobering reminder that as it is currently framed, the work-family debate smacks of elitism. The dominant narrative of middle-class women seeking to combine fulfilling jobs with more quality time for family clashes with that of poorer women, who have long worked for pay because they had to.

Read Full Review of The XX Factor | See more reviews from NY Times

Guardian

Good
Reviewed by Katharine Whitehorn on Apr 27 2013

...a crucial bible for anyone wanting to check up on anything about contemporary women.

Read Full Review of The XX Factor | See more reviews from Guardian

Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Jenny Turner on Apr 26 2013

...what's supposed to be "the XX factor" that makes for what the Times journalist called "alpha women". Does Wolf herself know, I wonder, or is it XX as in something she meant to fill in properly later, except that time ran out and she forgot?

Read Full Review of The XX Factor | See more reviews from Guardian

NY Journal of Books

Below average
Reviewed by Jane Haile on Sep 30 2013

Overall while this is an interesting and provocative analysis Ms. Wolf tends to overemphasize the previous sisterly solidarity for which there is little evidence and portrays the current sisterly differences too starkly...

Read Full Review of The XX Factor | See more reviews from NY Journal of Books

NY Journal of Books

Below average
Reviewed by Jane Haile on Sep 30 2013

As is true so often in life more could have been achieved had less been attempted. Her efforts to draw together so many threads over such a broad canvas inevitably lead to discontinuities and contradictions.

Read Full Review of The XX Factor | See more reviews from NY Journal of Books

WSJ online

Above average
Reviewed by Aifric Campbell on Nov 12 2013

Ms. Wolf starts slowly but soon hits her stride. The extensive notes entertain and frustrate: There is some creative guesswork behind the estimated 70 million elite, and the website pointer didn't deliver the promised detail on statistical method. But this book of evidence illuminates our vision of the future.

Read Full Review of The XX Factor | See more reviews from WSJ online

Reader Rating for The XX Factor
67%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 58 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×