This House Has Fallen by Karl Maier
Midnight in Nigeria

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 5 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

A journey into contemporary Africa's most powerful, most corrupt nation.. To understand Africa, you have to understand Nigeria, and few Americans understand Nigeria better than Karl Maier. In the tradition of Philip Gourevitch's bestselling We Regret to Inform You...and Redmond O'Hanlon's No Mercy, This House Has Fallen is a bracing, disturbing, evocative report on the state of Africa's most populous, potentially richest, and most dangerously dysfunctional nation.Each year, with depressing consistency, Nigeria is declared the most corrupt state in the entire world. A nation into which billions of dollars of oil money flow, Nigeria's per capita income has dramatically fallen in the past two decades. All of the money has been stolen by elites. Also stolen has been democracy. Nigeria's leaders tend to elect themselves, often with the help of a gun. Military coup follows military coup. A rare democratic election is often merely a prelude to the next seizure of power by a general who wants greater access to the state's rapidly depleted vaults. A country of rising ethnic tensions and falling standards of living, Nigeria is a bellwether for Africa. And yet some think it is on the verge of utter collapse, a collapse that could overshadow even the massacres in Rwanda.A brilliant piece of reportage and travel writing, this book looks into the Nigerian abyss and comes away with insight, profound conclusions, and even some hope. To understand Africa, you have to understand Nigeria, and few Americans understand Nigeria better than Karl Maier. In the tradition of Philip Gourevitch's bestselling We Regret to Inform You...and Redmond O'Hanlon's No Mercy, This House Has Fallen is a bracing, disturbing, evocative report on the state of Africa's most populous, potentially richest, and most dangerously dysfunctional nation.Each year, with depressing consistency, Nigeria is declared the most corrupt state in the entire world. A nation into which billions of dollars of oil money flow, Nigeria's per capita income has dramatically fallen in the past two decades. All of the money has been stolen by elites. Also stolen has been democracy. Nigeria's leaders tend to elect themselves, often with the help of a gun. Military coup follows military coup. A rare democratic election is often merely a prelude to the next seizure of power by a general who wants greater access to the state's rapidly depleted vaults. A country of rising ethnic tensions and falling standards of living, Nigeria is a bellwether for Africa. And yet some think it is on the verge of utter collapse, a collapse that could overshadow even the massacres in Rwanda.A brilliant piece of reportage and travel writing, this book looks into the Nigerian abyss and comes away with insight, profound conclusions, and even some hope. *The first significant book on this subject in decades Nigeria is strategically vital to the United States-- it is one of our major suppliers of oil .
 

About Karl Maier

See more books from this Author
 
Published July 1, 2000 by PublicAffairs. 327 pages
Genres: Business & Economics, History, Political & Social Sciences, Law & Philosophy.

Unrated Critic Reviews for This House Has Fallen

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

The central tribes, mostly Christian, resent the role of the northerners in the coups that have roiled Nigeria, and their efforts to establish Muslim law—the Sharia.

| Read Full Review of This House Has Fallen: Midnig...

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

We... ignore Nigeria at our peril, warns Maier, a journalist who was stationed in Africa for more than a decade (as a London Independent correspondent). Nigeria, the tenth most populous country in

Jul 03 2000 | Read Full Review of This House Has Fallen: Midnig...

The Guardian

See more reviews from this publication

He describes a country on the brink of a nervous breakdown but, disappointingly, offers little vision of Nigeria's future.

Feb 10 2001 | Read Full Review of This House Has Fallen: Midnig...

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

Although many books have portrayed the problems of today's Africa, Maier, former Africa correspondent for the Independent of London, takes a more hopeful view.

| Read Full Review of This House Has Fallen: Midnig...

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

Maier untangles Nigeria's political and social chaos for readers by talking to individual Nigerians--desperately poor Igbos, angry taxicab drivers, military and religious leaders, businessmen--and creating out of these encounters a compelling narrative, though one that fails to cohere at points w...

| Read Full Review of This House Has Fallen: Midnig...

Reader Rating for This House Has Fallen
72%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 21 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review