This Republic of Suffering by Drew Gilpin Faust
Death and the American Civil War (Vintage Civil War Library)

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 13 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

More than 600,000 soldiers lost their lives in the American Civil War. An equivalent proportion of today's population would be six million. In This Republic of Suffering, Drew Gilpin Faust reveals the ways that death on such a scale changed not only individual lives but the life of the nation, describing how the survivors managed on a practical level and how a deeply religious culture struggled to reconcile the unprecedented carnage with its belief in a benevolent God. Throughout, the voices of soldiers and their families, of statesmen, generals, preachers, poets, surgeons, nurses, northerners and southerners come together to give us a vivid understanding of the Civil War's most fundamental and widely shared reality.




From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

About Drew Gilpin Faust

See more books from this Author
Drew Gilpin Faust is president of Harvard University, where she also holds the Lincoln Professorship in History. Dean of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study from 2001 to 2007, she came to Harvard after twenty-five years on the faculty of the University of Pennsylvania. She is the author of five previous books, including Mothers of Invention: Women of the Slaveholding South in the American Civil War, which won the Francis Parkman Prize and the Avery Craven Prize. She and her husband live in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
 
Published January 8, 2008 by Vintage. 368 pages
Genres: History, War, Education & Reference, Biographies & Memoirs. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for This Republic of Suffering

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

Harvard president and historian Faust (Mothers of Invention: Women of the Slaveholding South in the American Civil War, 1996, etc.) begins with a recitation of some telling facts: The number of soldiers who died in the Civil War, about 620,000, equals those felled from the American Revolution to ...

| Read Full Review of This Republic of Suffering: D...

The New York Times

See more reviews from this publication

When one Union soldier was killed during the siege of Richmond, a comrade told his mother that while her boy had died instantly and without the opportunity to declare his faith, he had told his fellow soldiers the previous summer that he “felt his sins were forgiven & that he was ready and resign...

Jan 27 2008 | Read Full Review of This Republic of Suffering: D...

BC Books

See more reviews from this publication

Harvard University's president examines how hundreds of thousands of Civil War deaths changed America in unexpected ways.

Jan 30 2009 | Read Full Review of This Republic of Suffering: D...

BC Books

See more reviews from this publication

Even though the war would show the need for gathering accurate information, some families were left wondering for years after the war had ended, helping spur the growth of the spiritualist movement The thousands of fatalities meant something else - thousands of bodies.

Jan 30 2009 | Read Full Review of This Republic of Suffering: D...

BC Books

See more reviews from this publication

Near the conclusion of the book, Faust observes a particular dilemma at the core of trying to understand the deaths caused by the war: "how to grasp the significance of a single death and the meaning of hundreds of thousands."

Jan 30 2009 | Read Full Review of This Republic of Suffering: D...

Christian Science Monitor

[This review from the Monitor's archives originally ran on Jan. 29, 2008.] "Your son, Corporal Frank H.

May 30 2010 | Read Full Review of This Republic of Suffering: D...

Suite 101

As the current president of Harvard University and the author of a number of books on the antebellum South and the American Civil War, her latest offering presents to the reader a rather different perspective regarding the war.

Dec 29 2010 | Read Full Review of This Republic of Suffering: D...

Review (Barnes & Noble)

Civil War social historian Drew Gilpin Faust, recently installed as president of Harvard University, has written an eye-opening, thoroughly researched, and highly original account of how the Civil War generation dealt with the daily, horrific realities of death.

Feb 05 2008 | Read Full Review of This Republic of Suffering: D...

Historical Novel Society

Drew Gilpin Faust, the first female president of Harvard University, provides us with an extraordinarily well-researched and superbly written scholarly treatise on the disposal of the dead during the American Civil War.

| Read Full Review of This Republic of Suffering: D...

Bookmarks Magazine

Every American high school student has probably heard the statistics: more soldiers died in the Civil War than in all other U.S. wars combined, and more Americans died in one day at Antietam than have died in the entire Iraq War.

Apr 10 2008 | Read Full Review of This Republic of Suffering: D...

Project MUSE

So many Americans met their ends in this war (620,000 soldiers and perhaps 50,000 civilians) that the nation was forced to create new traditions of mourning, new technologies of preserving and burying bodies, and new spiritual conceptions that would allow them to reconcile the slaughter with thei...

| Read Full Review of This Republic of Suffering: D...

Scholars And Rogues

Faust offers plenty of context for those statistics: The estimated number of soldiers that died exceeds the combined death tolls of the Revolution, War of 1812, the Mexican War, the Spanish-American War, Word War I, World War II, and the Korean War;

Nov 25 2008 | Read Full Review of This Republic of Suffering: D...

Civil War News

Although it is a morbid subject, the book is a stirring tour de force, a thought-provoking piece of social history telling how the beliefs of Victorian culture of death were challenged by the dehumanizing process of a civil war.

| Read Full Review of This Republic of Suffering: D...

Reader Rating for This Republic of Suffering
84%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 246 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×