Time Travel by James Gleick

83%

7 Critic Reviews

Deeply philosophical and full of quirky humor—“The universe is like a river. It flows. (Or it doesn’t, if you’re Plato.)”—Gleick’s journey through the fourth dimension is a marvelous mind bender.
-Publishers Weekly

Synopsis

From the acclaimed author of The Information and Chaos, here is a mind-bending exploration of time travel: its subversive origins, its evolution in literature and science, and its influence on our understanding of time itself.

The story begins at the turn of the previous century, with the young H. G. Wells writing and rewriting the fantastic tale that became his first book and an international sensation: The Time Machine. It was an era when a host of forces was converging to transmute the human understanding of time, some philosophical and some technological: the electric telegraph, the steam railroad, the discovery of buried civilizations, and the perfection of clocks. James Gleick tracks the evolution of time travel as an idea that becomes part of contemporary culture—from Marcel Proust to Doctor Who, from Jorge Luis Borges to Woody Allen. He investigates the inevitable looping paradoxes and examines the porous boundary between pulp fiction and modern physics. Finally, he delves into a temporal shift that is unsettling our own moment: the instantaneous wired world, with its all-consuming present and vanishing future.

(With a color frontispiece and black-and-white illustrations throughout) 


From the Hardcover edition.
 

About James Gleick

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James Gleick (www.around.com) was born in New York City in 1954. He worked for ten years as an editor and reporter for The New York Times, founded an early Internet portal, the Pipeline, and wrote three previous books: Chaos, Genius, and Faster. His latest book Isaac Newton is available from Pantheon. He lives in the Hudson Valley of New York with his wife.
 
Published September 27, 2016 by Pantheon. 353 pages
Genres: History, Science Fiction & Fantasy, Literature & Fiction, Science & Math, Political & Social Sciences. Non-fiction
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Critic reviews for Time Travel
All: 7 | Positive: 6 | Negative: 1

Kirkus

Above average
on Jul 05 2016

Though not his best book, this is another fantastic contribution to popular science from Gleick, whose lush storytelling will appeal to a wide range of audiences.

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Publishers Weekly

Excellent
on Jun 22 2017

Deeply philosophical and full of quirky humor—“The universe is like a river. It flows. (Or it doesn’t, if you’re Plato.)”—Gleick’s journey through the fourth dimension is a marvelous mind bender.

Read Full Review of Time Travel | See more reviews from Publishers Weekly

NY Times

Good
Reviewed by Anthony Doerr on Sep 26 2016

The good news? “Time Travel,” like all of Gleick’s work, is a fascinating mash-up of philosophy, literary criticism, physics and cultural observation.

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Globe and Mail

Good
Reviewed by Ivan Semeniuk on Oct 07 2016

A science book that demands to be read is one that expertly reveals the characters, perspectives and hidden connections that make our world. That’s the essence of Gleick’s craftsmanship, and it’s what makes great science writing timeless.

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LA Times

Good
Reviewed by Kate Tuttle on Nov 07 2016

Posed about midway through his dazzling, dizzying history of time travel, the question is just one of dozens that will make most readers stop reading, stare off into space and think.

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NY Times

Good
Reviewed by Anthony Doerr on Sep 26 2016

...a fascinating mash-up of philosophy, literary criticism, physics and cultural observation. It’s witty (“Regret is the time traveler’s energy bar”), pithy (“What is time? Things change, and time is how we keep track”) and regularly manages to twist its reader’s mind into those Gordian knots I so loved as a boy.

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National Post arts

Good
Reviewed by ROBERT J. WIERSEMA on Oct 24 2016

Gleick is a graceful writer with a knack for synthesis and explanation. Few are able to shift so deftly between analyses of science and discussions of art, as if they are simply different aspects of the same concern...

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Reader Rating for Time Travel
71%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 35 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


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