Tin Drum by Gunter Grass

80%

8 Critic Reviews

It's Grass's dazzling use of language that sets The Tin Drum apart, as he spins a dense verbal web alive with wordplay and innovation.
-Guardian

Synopsis

(Book Jacket Status#58; Jacketed)pAcclaimed as the greatest German novel written since the end of World War II, bThe Tin Drum/b is the autobiography of thirty-year-old Oskar Matzerath, who has lived through the long Nazi nightmare and who, as the novel begins, is being held in a mental institution. Willfully stunting his growth at three feet for many years, wielding his tin drum and piercing scream as anarchistic weapons, he provides a profound yet hilarious perspective on both German history and the human condition in the modern world.pIntroduction by John Reddick; Translation by Ralph Manheim
 

About Gunter Grass

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Born on October 16, 1927 in Gdansk, Poland, Günter Grass was a member of the Hitler Youth in the 1930s. At the age of 16, he was drafted into the German military, was wounded, and became a prisoner of war in 1945. His first novel, The Tin Drum (1959), selected by the French as the best foreign language book of 1962, is the story of Oscar Matzerath, a boy who refuses to grow up as a protest to the cruelty of German society during the war. It is the first part of his Danzig trilogy, followed by Cat and Mouse (1961) and Dog Years (1963), and was made into a movie by director Volker Schlondorff, winning the Academy Award for Best Foreign Film in 1979. His other works include Local Anaesthetic, The Flounder, Crabwalk, and Peeling the Onion. He has been honored many times, including a distinguished service medal from the Federal Republic of Germany in 1980 which he refused to accept. He received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1999.
 
Published December 1, 1962 by Martin Secker & Warburg Ltd. 592 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, History, War, Travel. Fiction
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Critic reviews for Tin Drum
All: 8 | Positive: 7 | Negative: 1

Kirkus

Below average
Reviewed by Kirkus Reviews on May 07 2008

It is a novel of many interpretations, moral and political -- which many will find forceful, fascinating, brilliantly sardonic (and sacriligious); it also pays the price of much of its outrageous invention and is, towards the close, wearing.

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Guardian

Above average
on Nov 08 2009

It's Grass's dazzling use of language that sets The Tin Drum apart, as he spins a dense verbal web alive with wordplay and innovation.

Read Full Review of Tin Drum | See more reviews from Guardian

Guardian

Excellent
on Oct 07 2009

A melange of bildungsroman, memoir, allegory, grotesquerie and pure reverie.

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Examiner

Good
on Jan 08 2011

There is not a single dull moment from one cover to the other, and the language is absolutely beautiful.

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Christian Science Monitor

Good
on Oct 28 2009

Half a century after its debut, “The Tin Drum” remains a unique, irreverent exploration of a society deranged, crumbling.

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Bookmarks Magazine

Excellent
on Oct 11 2009

After fifty years, THE TIN DRUM has, if anything, gained in power and relevance.

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Literary Kicks

Excellent
on Apr 09 2003

The Tin Drum is a stunning read and is the reason why forty years after its release, Grass, praised for his "cheerful destructiveness and creative irreverence," received the Nobel Prize for Literature.

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Ken Greenleaf

Above average
on Dec 15 2009

It's appropriate that we now have a second English version of Grass's first novel. If it isn't one, it's the other. Perhaps.

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Reader Rating for Tin Drum
77%

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