To Kill the Leopard by Theodore Taylor

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Synopsis

A riveting account of the hunt for the elusive leopard U-boat as told from both the Allied and German sides.
 

About Theodore Taylor

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Author Theodore Taylor was born in Statesville, North Carolina on June 23, 1921. At the age of seventeen, he became a copyboy at the Washington, D. C. Daily News and was writing radio network sports for NBC in New York two years later. During World War II, he joined the merchant marines and earned a commission as an ensign in the U. S. Navy. He was recalled to active duty during the Korean War. In 1955, he became a press agent for Paramount Pictures and later became a story editor and an associate producer. He has written over fifty fiction and non-fiction books for young adults and adults. He has received numerous awards for his works including the Lewis Carroll Shelf Award for The Cay, the 1992 Edgar Allen Poe Award for Best Young Adult Mystery for The Weirdo, and the 1996 Scott O'Dell Award for historical fiction for The Bomb. He died on October 26, 2006.
 
Published June 18, 1993 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 316 pages
Genres: History, War, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

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Kirkus Reviews

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Back at the big Nazi submarine base at Lorient, Kammerer unwarily gives information to his French mistress, who passes it on to the British, who can then track ``The Leopard.'' Creaks with seagoing detail, weather, storms, and battle at sea.

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Publishers Weekly

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Theodore Taylor (The Cay) continues the story of Ben, begun with Sniper, in Lord of the Kill.

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Publishers Weekly

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Taylor draws his characters, merchant sailors and U-boat crewmen alike, with vivid realism--the portrait of Kammerer, in particular, captures the reckless spirit of a successful U-boat commander--and accurately depicts such settings as a U-boat base at Lorient in occupied France.

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Los Angeles Times

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As if to let us know that Kammerer is no barbarian, Taylor depicts him as a sophisticated reader of Henry Miller, and Kammerer machine-guns a lifeboat only when one of the survivors takes a shot at one of his officers.

Jul 07 1993 | Read Full Review of To Kill the Leopard

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