To Know a Woman by Amos Oz
(Harvest in translation)

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Synopsis

As an Israeli secret service agent, Yoel Ravid’s ability to sense the truth made him invaluable. Now widowed and retired, he lives with his mother, his mother-in-law, his daughter, and the haunting memory of his wife. A New York Times Notable Book of the Year. Translated by Nicholas de Lange. A Helen and Kurt Wolff Book
 

About Amos Oz

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Amos Oz was born in Jerusalem in 1939. He is the author of fourteen novels and collections of short fiction, and numerous works of nonfiction. His acclaimed memoir A Tale of Love and Darkness was an international bestseller and recipient of the prestigious Goethe prize, as well as the National Jewish Book Award. Scenes from Village Life, a New York Times Notable Book, was awarded the Prix Méditerranée Étranger in 2010. He lives in Tel Aviv, Israel.
 
Published January 1, 1992 by Vintage Books. 273 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for To Know a Woman

Kirkus Reviews

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Floating through this tangle of relationships, Yoel keeps telling himself that things will work out, that tomorrow is another day, but he's wrong--as he sees when his mother and Netta's lover Duby Krantz tell him off for his inability to accept people without controlling them, and when he's unabl...

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Publishers Weekly

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One of Israel's best-known novelists pens a compelling psychological study of an Israeli espionage agent who retires following his wife's accidental death.

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Publishers Weekly

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Respected in the secret service for his methodical working technique and self-control, Yoel Ravid is attempting to confront the unresolved issues of his marriage while remembering, almost despite himself, ``the rare, unexpected moments when the blackness of existence was momentarily illuminated.'...

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London Review of Books

Partly, no doubt, this is a question of Israel’s history, and of the urgency of the material which it offers, but there’s also the possibility that when a writer decides to leap boldly into the area where ideology leaves off and action begins, significant analogies between political and literary ...

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