Too Loud a Solitude by Bohumil Hrabal

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Synopsis

Hantá rescues books from the jaws of his compacting press and carries them home. Hrabal, whom Milan Kundera calls “our very best writer today,” celebrates the power and the indestructibility of the written word. Translated by Michael Henry Heim.
 

About Bohumil Hrabal

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Bohumil Hrabal (1914-1997) was born in Moravia and started writing poems under the influence of French surrealism. In the early 1950s he began to experiment with a stream-of-consciousness style, and eventually wrote such classics as "Closely Watched Trains" (made into an Academy Award-winning film directed by Jiri Menzel), "The Death of Mr. Baltisberger", and "Too Loud a Solitude". He fell to his death from the fifth floor of a Prague hospital, apparently trying to feed the pigeons. Michael Henry Heim was born in New York on January 21, 1943. He received an undergraduate degree from Columbia University and a doctorate in Slavic languages from Harvard University. He was fluent in Czech, French, German, Italian, Russian and Serbian/Croatian and possessed a reading knowledge of six more languages. He became a professor of Slavic languages at the University California at Los Angeles in 1972 and served as chairman of the Slavic languages department from 1999 to 2003. He was known for his translations of works by Gunter Grass, Milan Kundera, Thomas Mann and Anton Chekhov. He received numerous awards for his work including the Helen and Kurt Wolff Translator's Prize in 2005, the PEN/Ralph Manheim Medal for Translation in 2009, and the PEN Translation Prize in 2010. He died from complications of melanoma on September 29, 2012 at the age of 69.
 
Published April 27, 1992 by Mariner Books. 112 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Political & Social Sciences. Fiction

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Symbols fly every which way as the bedraggled and begrimed Hanta--often bloodied top to toe from handling vast loads of used butcher's-paper--meditates upon the meaning of his archival work under the ancient foundations of Prague, himself becoming a philosophic artist, carefully fashioning master...

Sep 01 1990 | Read Full Review of Too Loud a Solitude

Publishers Weekly

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Czechoslovakian author Hrabal ( I Served the King of England ) pens an absorbing fable about a man who educates himself with the discarded printed matter he collects. (Mar.)

Apr 27 1992 | Read Full Review of Too Loud a Solitude

Publishers Weekly

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Czechoslovakian author Hrabal ( I Served the King of England ) pens an absorbing fable about a man who educates himself with the discarded printed matter he collects.

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