Tribal Journey by Gary Robinson
PathFinders

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 1 Critic Review

An uncomplicated tale of mirrored inner and outer journeys, welcome for its look at Native American characters in a modern context.
-Kirkus

Synopsis

Jason's lucky to be alive, but life in a wheelchair was not in his plans. Even when he was protecting his mom and siblings from his drunken father or escaping from home to be with his friends, he never imagined his future in a wheelchair.

When reading a text message while driving, he is in a car accident that leaves him with a paralyzed leg. Jason sees himself only as a kid who will always be paralyzed, but when he becomes part of the Raven Canoe Family and learns to "pull" a canoe, his outlook on life begins to change.

After completing a two-week tribal canoe journey with his Duwamish tribal members, Jason is proud to be a Coast Salish Indian. From the hardships and camaraderie of the journey, he gains a new sense of courage and determination to someday swim and walk again.
 

About Gary Robinson

See more books from this Author
Gary Robinson, a writer and filmmaker of Cherokee and Choctaw Indian descent, has spent more than 25 years working with American Indian communities to tell the historical and contemporary stories of Native people in all forms of media. His other PathFinder novels are Little Brother of War, Thunder on the Plains, and Tribal Journey. Gary's television work has aired on PBS, Turner Broadcasting, Ovation Network, and others. His nonfiction books, From Warriors to Soldiers and The Language of Victory, reveal little-known aspects of American Indian service in the US military from the Revolutionary War to modern times. Gary lives in rural central California.
 
Published July 14, 2013 by 7th Generation. 123 pages
Genres: Young Adult, Literature & Fiction, Children's Books. Fiction
Add Critic Review

Critic reviews for Tribal Journey
All: 1 | Positive: 1 | Negative: 0

Kirkus

Good
on Mar 17 2013

An uncomplicated tale of mirrored inner and outer journeys, welcome for its look at Native American characters in a modern context.

Read Full Review of Tribal Journey: PathFinders | See more reviews from Kirkus

Rate this book!

Add Review
×