Truth Like the Sun by Jim Lynch

85%

20 Critic Reviews

It’s impossible not to hurtle through “Truth Like the Sun” to see where Helen’s determination to nail Roger, and Roger’s determination to stay as honest with Seattle as he is with himself, will lead.
-NY Times

Synopsis

A classic and hugely entertaining political novel, the cat-and-mouse story of urban intrigue in Seattle both in 1962, when Seattle hosted the World's Fair, and in 2001, after its transformation in the Microsoft gold rush.

Larger than life, Roger Morgan was the mastermind behind the fair that made the city famous and is still a backstage power forty years later, when at the age of seventy he runs for mayor in hopes of restoring all of Seattle's former glory. Helen Gulanos, a reporter every bit as eager to make her mark, sees her assignment to investigate the events of 1962 become front-page news with Morgan's candidacy, and resolves to find out who he really is and where his power comes from: in 1962, a brash and excitable young promoter, greeting everyone from Elvis Presley to Lyndon Johnson, smooth-talking himself out of difficult situations, dipping in and out of secret card games; now, a beloved public figure with, it turns out, still-plentiful secrets. Wonderfully interwoven into this tale of the city of dreams are backroom deals, idealism and pragmatism, the best and worst ambitions, and all the aspirations that shape our communities and our lives.
 

About Jim Lynch

See more books from this Author
JIM LYNCH has received the H. L. Mencken Award and a Livingston Award for Young Journalists, among other national honors. His most recent novel, Border Songs, won the Washington State Book Award and is currently being adapted for television.
 
Published April 10, 2012 by Vintage. 274 pages
Genres: History, Literature & Fiction, Political & Social Sciences. Fiction
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Critic reviews for Truth Like the Sun
All: 20 | Positive: 17 | Negative: 3

Kirkus

Excellent
Reviewed by Kirkus Reviews on Mar 05 2012

A briskly paced novel that gives us an insider’s view into both the politics of culture and the culture of politics.

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NY Times

Excellent
Reviewed by Janet Maslin on Apr 09 2012

It’s impossible not to hurtle through “Truth Like the Sun” to see where Helen’s determination to nail Roger, and Roger’s determination to stay as honest with Seattle as he is with himself, will lead.

Read Full Review of Truth Like the Sun | See more reviews from NY Times

Publishers Weekly

Below average
Reviewed by PW on Apr 30 2012

Executed at a heady clip, the book gets some special traction from posing capitalism under the menacing shadow of Khrushchev against pre-9/11 apathy. But characters like Morgan and Gulanos are ultimately no more than values, their functions and destiny foregone, in service of awfully small stakes.

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NPR

Excellent
Reviewed by Alan Cheuse on Jun 14 2012

This serious but charming rather old-fashioned sort of book about complicated folks in the midst of life's struggles is just big enough to embrace a number of important themes and topics...and just small enough to make all of this...engaging.

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Book Reporter

Below average
Reviewed by Michael Magras on Apr 13 2012

There are many reasons to worry about the press’s decline --- if that is, in fact, what we are witnessing --- but I wish Lynch’s take on this theme had been more nuanced and more fully explored.

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Globe and Mail

Excellent
Reviewed by Andrew Pyper on Apr 23 2012

Truth Like the Sun is neither raucous enough for outright comedy nor biting enough for satire, yet, like a good mayoral candidate, it fizzes with humour and likability.

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Toronto Star

Above average
Reviewed by Jason Beerman on Jun 25 2012

At times, Roger’s idealism seems so pure, it borders on naïveté. At others, he operates with cunning ambition. But throughout, he remains a dreamer who simply wants the city he loves to thrive and succeed.

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Toronto Star

Excellent
Reviewed by Jason Beerman on May 19 2012

As times, it reads like a lo-fi political campaign exposé and at others, it reads like a small-scale version of All the President’s Men

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Entertainment Weekly

Excellent
Reviewed by Keith Staskiewicz on Apr 13 2012

It's the author's own journalistic eye for detail that turns the stereotypically gray city into something vibrantly colorful.

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The Washington Post

Excellent
Reviewed by Ron Charles on Apr 10 2012

“Truth Like the Sun” illuminates the city’s commingled beauty and vanity with a story of civic pride, political intrigue and journalistic tenacity.

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The Independent

Excellent
Reviewed by Christian House on Apr 08 2012

Lynch, however, has managed to stay the course and with the publication of his third novel, Truth Like the Sun, mature into a consummate stylist.

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Christian Science Monitor

Excellent
Reviewed by Anna Lundow on May 24 2012

In Jim Lynch's propulsive new novel, Truth Like the Sun, the crimes are in the past, but the mystery surrounding them seeps through to the present, where glory-day memories conceal grubby secrets.

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Dallas News

Excellent
Reviewed by Jenny Shank on Apr 13 2012

Truth Like the Sun bears more than a whiff of nostalgia for the way newspapers can tell a city’s evolving story as no other media can, even through imperfect articles.

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Oregon Live

Excellent
Reviewed by Allen Cunningham on Apr 14 2012

In one breathtaking moment worthy of Steinbeck, Lynch manages to viscerally evoke a sense of Cold War dread, foreshadow the horrors of 9/11 and offer an ode to the beauty and delicacy of the idealism that built

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Bookmarks Magazine

Excellent
Reviewed by Jon on Apr 09 2012

Wonderfully interwoven into this tale of the city of dreams are backroom deals, idealism and pragmatism, the best and worst ambitions, and all the aspirations that shape our communities and our lives.

Read Full Review of Truth Like the Sun

The Seattle Times

Excellent
Reviewed by Moira Macdonald on Apr 08 2012

Jim Lynch's addictive new novel is a tale of two cities, both of them Seattle — the brash 1962 home of the World's Fair, and the chastened 2001 edition, still in shock from the dot-com boom and bust.

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Fiction Addict

Excellent
Reviewed by Jen Roman on Apr 03 2012

Alternating between 1962 and 2001, Truth Like the Sun highlights the coming-of-age of both America and Seattle.

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It's Either Sadness or Euphoria

Good
Reviewed by LHH on Jun 02 2012

Lynch does a fantastic job weaving the two narratives, and I found myself in the same quandary as Helen—I wanted to know more about what makes Morgan tick but I was also afraid of what might be uncovered.

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Bite the Book

Good
Reviewed by Jon Page on Feb 10 2012

This is a brilliant book than jumps between the idealism and nostalgia of the 60s and the cynical and cutthroat world of the early 2000s.

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Book Addiction

Below average
Reviewed by Richard on May 01 2012

While Jim Lynch’s newly released novel Truth Like the Sun didn’t give me the sense of wonder that I got from his Border Songs, it ought to find a wide and interested audience.

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Reader Rating for Truth Like the Sun
67%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 117 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


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