Two Little Trains by Margaret Wise Brown

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Synopsis

PUFF,
PUFF,
PUFF
CHUG,
CHUG,
CHUG

ALL ABOARD!

Two trains are heading West. One is a shiny train, moving fast. The other Is an old train, moving not so fast. What can they have in common? Much more than you think!

This treasured story from the author of Goodnight Moon has been newly illustrated by two-time Caldecott Medalists Leo and Diane Dillon. Margaret Wise Brown's brilliantly simple text is fittingly showcased by the Dillons' extraordinarily inventive illustrations. You'll be surprised where the two little trains take you. Come and see!

 

About Margaret Wise Brown

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Few writers have been as attuned to the concerns and emotions of childhood as Margaret Wise Brown (1910-1952). A graduate of Hollins College and the progressive Bank Street College of Education, she combined her literary aspirations with the study of child development. Her unique ability to see the world through a child's eyes is unequaled. Her many classic books continue to delight thousands of young listeners and readers year after year. hr Muy pocos escritores de literatura infantil han logrado captar las emociones e inquietudes de la niÑez como Margaret Wise Brown (1910-1952). Sus numerosos y ya clÁsicos libros y grabaciones continÚan deleitando a lectores y oyentes de todas las edades. Leo Dillon was born in Brooklyn, New York on March 2, 1933. He attended Parsons School of Design in New York City, where he met his wife Diane (Sorber) Dillon. They graduated in 1956, married in 1957, and soon became a husband and wife team of illustrators. During his lifetime, they published over 40 children's books including Hakon of Rogen's Saga by Eric Hagard, The Ring in the Prairie by John Bierhorst, The People Could Fly: American Black Folktales by Virginia Hamilton, and If Kids Ran the World. They won the Caldecott Medal in 1976 for Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears by Verna Aardema and in 1977 for Ashanti to Zulu: African Traditions by Margaret Musgrove. They also won a Coretta Scott King Award and five Coretta Scott King Honors. In 2002, they published the first picture book they wrote themselves, Rap a Tap Tap: Here's Bojangles-Think of That! They also created cover designs for adult science fiction books. He died from complications of lung surgery on May 26, 2012 at the age of 79. Two-time Caldecott-winning illustrators Leo and Diane Dillon have illustrated over 25 books for children, and have received many honors, including two Coretta Scott King Awards and the Society of Illustrators Gold Medal. They live in Brooklyn, NY.
 
Published January 1, 2002 by HarperCollins Publishers. 32 pages
Genres: Education & Reference, Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Two Little Trains

Kirkus Reviews

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The Dillons illustrate both the charming domestic interiors and the sweep of landscape with elegant geometric forms, colors of great depth and richness, and their magical touch: the man in the moon is the “black man singing in the West.” The relationship between the two trains is also illuminated...

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Publishers Weekly

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"Each spread chronicles the parallel journeys of the titular trains. On the left, a streamlined train stretches against expansive vistas, while, on the right, a toy wooden locomotive travels o

Nov 03 2003 | Read Full Review of Two Little Trains

Publishers Weekly

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Two-time Caldecott Medalists Leo and Diane Dillon team up with Margaret Wise Brown in Two Little Trains, first published in 1949. Right from the cover, the sleek, horizontal illustrations chronicle

May 01 2001 | Read Full Review of Two Little Trains

Publishers Weekly

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Little Bear's first ""song,"" for example, includes these lines: ""A little bear was singing/ In words that seemed to say/ It's a long time that/ I'll love you/ Never, never go away/ It's a long time that I'll love you/ And if I seem to stray/ It's only that I'm watching/ The flowers bloom in May...

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Publishers Weekly

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Published for the first time as a standalone, this story from Brown's 1939 collection, The Fish with the Deep Sea Smile, features a boy who understands that creatures are never all good or all bad, but good and bad all at once—a reassuring message for small children.

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Publishers Weekly

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by Leonard Weisgard, tells about the seasons and animals that touch a small island (""There was a little Island in the ocean./ Around it the winds blew/ And the birds flew/ And the tides rose and fell on the shore""), and a kitten who comes ashore learns a secret about the island and a lesson...

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Publishers Weekly

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""Old man scarecrow"" is teaching his son the family business, and although the scarecrow boy is eager to ply his trade, his father tells him repeatedly ""No, little boy./ You can't go./ You're not fierce enough/ to scare a crow./ Wait till you grow."" But one day the lad can't resist giving his ...

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Publishers Weekly

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Brown's dialogue rings false, as when the child visits a pigpen (""Shoo, little pigs, take a bath so that this dirty little boy can learn how to get clean"").

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Publishers Weekly

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inside, Brown introduces readers to ""a little fur family/ warm as toast/ smaller than most/ in little fur coats"" and the ""warm wooden tree"" in which they live.

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Publishers Weekly

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Wolff treats Brown's bedtime poem to luminous, large-scale pictures that glow with the radiance and precision of stained glass.

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Publishers Weekly

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On the left, a streamlined train stretches against expansive vistas, while, on the right, a toy wooden locomotive travels on familiar domestic turf, locations wittily chosen to mimic the path of its mammoth modern counterpart," said PW in a Best Books citation.

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Publishers Weekly

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""One little train was a streamlined train,/ Puff, Puff, Puff to the West./ One little train was a little old train,/ Chug, Chug, Chug going West."" In one spread, the trains look down at the ""deep dark river."" The streamlined train races across a purple bridge while, opposite, the toy tra...

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