Two Treatises of Government by John Locke

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See Reader Rating

Synopsis

John Locke's "Two Treatises of Government" are considered to be some of the most important works of western philosophy ever written. In the first treatise Locke disputes the divine right of monarchial rule principle that is put forth in the book "Patriarcha" by Sir Robert Filmer. In the second treatise Locke sets forth the basic principles of natural law that lay the foundation for basic human rights and the government of man. Also contained within this volume is the shorter work, "A Letter Concerning Toleration."
 

About John Locke

See more books from this Author
John Locke (1632-1704) was educated at Christ Church, Oxford and held various academic posts at that university, lecturing on Greek and rhetoric. However, his interests lay in medicine and the new experimental sciences and in 1667 he became personal physician to the Earl of Shaftesbury. Under the influence of Shaftesbury, Locke developed his ideas on politics, property, trade, monarchy and the mind. Shaftesbury became a bitter opponent of Charles II and was involved in the plot of 1683. This forced Locke to flee in exile to Holland, but he returned after 1688 and began to publish his most famous works. He wrote also on tehology, education, and in defence of religous tolerance, while founding the analytic philosophy of the mind. Roger Woolhouse is Professor of Philosophy at the University of York. He has also edited George Berkeley's Principles of Human Knowledge and Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous for Penguin Classics.
 
Published December 3, 2009 by Digireads.com. 176 pages
Genres: History, Political & Social Sciences, Law & Philosophy, Literature & Fiction, Education & Reference, Professional & Technical, War. Non-fiction

Reader Rating for Two Treatises of Government
80%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 59 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×