Understanding and Communicating Social Informatics by Howard Rosenbaum
A Framework for Studying and Teaching the Human Contexts of Information and Communication Technologies

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Synopsis

Here is a sustained investigation into the human contexts of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), covering both research and theory in this emerging field. Authors Kling, Rosenbaum, and Sawyer demonstrate that the design, adoption, and use of ICTs are deeply connected to people’s actions as well as to the environments in which they are used. In Chapters One and Two, they define Social Informatics and offer a pragmatic overview of the discipline. In Chapters Three and Four, they articulate its fundamental ideas for specific audiences and present important research findings about the personal, social, and organizational consequences of ICT design and use. Chapter Five covers Social Informatics education; Chapter Six discusses ways to communicate Social Informatics to professional and research communities; and Chapter Seven provides a summary and look to the future.
 

About Howard Rosenbaum

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Rob Kling is Professor in the Program in Information and ComRob Kling is Professor in the Program in Information and Computer Science, the Graduate School of Management, and the Puputer Science, the Graduate School of Management, and the Public Policy Research Organization at the University of Califblic Policy Research Organization at the University of California, Irvine. Spencer Olin is Professor of History and Markornia, Irvine. Spencer Olin is Professor of History and Mark Poster is Professor of History, both at the University of C Poster is Professor of History, both at the University of California, Irvine. alifornia, Irvine. Syracuse University
 
Published September 12, 2005 by Information Today, Inc.. 216 pages
Genres: Political & Social Sciences, Computers & Technology, Education & Reference, Science & Math. Non-fiction

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