Uproot by Jace Clayton
Travels in 21st-Century Music and Digital Culture

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 4 Critic Reviews

Uproot is witty and nuanced rather than sloganeering, and shot through with the immersive research and hard‑earned access to key, sometimes evasive, figures that would be the envy of any Ivy League anthropologist.
-Guardian

Synopsis

In 2001, Jace Clayton was an amateur DJ who recorded a three-turntable, sixty-minute mix called Gold Teeth Thiefand put it online to share with his friends. Within months, the mix became an international calling card, whisking Clayton away to a sprawling, multitiered nightclub in Zagreb, a tiny gallery in Osaka, a former brothel in São Paolo, and the atrium of MoMA. And just as the music world made its fitful, uncertain transition from analog to digital, Clayton found himself on the front lines of an education in the creative upheavals of art production in the twenty-first-century globalized world.

Uproot is a guided tour of this newly opened cultural space, mapped with both his own experiences and his relationships with other industry game-changers such as M.I.A. and Pirate Bay. With humor, insight, and expertise, Clayton illuminates the connections between a Congolese hotel band and the indie rock scene, Mexican surfers and Israeli techno, Japanese record collectors and hidden rain-forest treasure, and offers an unparalleled understanding of music in a digital age. Uproot takes readers behind the turntable decks to tell a story that only a DJ--and writer--of this caliber can tell.

 

About Jace Clayton

See more books from this Author
Jace Clayton's essays have appeared in The Washington Post, Bidoun, Frieze, and FADER, where he is a regular contributor. As DJ /rupture, he has performed widely and released several critically acclaimed albums. He lives and works in New York City.
 
Published August 16, 2016 by FSG Originals. 288 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Political & Social Sciences, Arts & Photography. Non-fiction
Add Critic Review

Critic reviews for Uproot
All: 4 | Positive: 4 | Negative: 0

Kirkus

Good
on May 25 2016

Sharply detailed exploration of how technology and globalization have transformed participatory audio culture for top-dollar DJs and African ensembles alike...An engrossing tour of the global cutting edge, balanced between memoir, musicology, and technology.

Read Full Review of Uproot: Travels in 21st-Centu... | See more reviews from Kirkus

Publishers Weekly

Excellent
on Jun 19 2016

Clayton urges readers to embrace the power of music, recognizing its energetic and enduring capacity to capture and express shared emotions and to become a “memory palace with room for everybody inside.”

Read Full Review of Uproot: Travels in 21st-Centu... | See more reviews from Publishers Weekly

LA Times

Above average
Reviewed by Max Pearl on Aug 19 2016

“Uproot” is a gripping read that balances vivid storytelling with rigorous analysis and reflection. Those looking for a concise thesis uniting all of these anecdotes will come up empty-handed, however; they don't so much illustrate one point as sketch a rough set of rules for how culture behaves in the 21st century.

Read Full Review of Uproot: Travels in 21st-Centu... | See more reviews from LA Times

Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Sukhdev Sandhu on Oct 27 2016

Uproot is witty and nuanced rather than sloganeering, and shot through with the immersive research and hard‑earned access to key, sometimes evasive, figures that would be the envy of any Ivy League anthropologist.

Read Full Review of Uproot: Travels in 21st-Centu... | See more reviews from Guardian
×