Vox by Nicholson Baker

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Synopsis

Baker has written a novel that remaps the territory of sex--solitary and telephonic, lyrical and profane, comfortable and dangerous. Written in the form of a phone conversation between two strangers, Vox is an erotic classic that places the author in the first rank of America's major writers.
 

About Nicholson Baker

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Nicholson Baker is the author of nine novels and five works of nonfiction, including The Anthologist, Human Smoke, and Double Fold (winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award). He lives in Maine with his family.
 
Published August 24, 2011 by Vintage. 178 pages
Genres: Erotica, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Vox

Kirkus Reviews

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Baker (The Mezzanine, Room Temperature), heretofore more a monologist, a literary performance artist, than much of a novelist, folds his deadpan honesty and funny fussiness double--and though Jim and Abby finally seem so much like the same voice that they don't really qualify as characters, they ...

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Publishers Weekly

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Bloch's latest horror story is a disappointing effort, despite his attempt to exploit the character of Norman Bates of Psycho fame. Having decided to write a book about Bates, Amy Haines travels to Fa

Jan 01 1990 | Read Full Review of Vox

Publishers Weekly

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For readers who feel that, descriptive virtuosity aside, Baker's previous books displayed a disturbingly narrow focus-- The Mezzanine documented an office worker's lunch-hour search for shoelaces;

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Publishers Weekly

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Baker's self-indulgent novel, a 14-week PW bestseller in cloth, transcribes a long telephone conversation between two people who meet over a phone-sex call-in line.

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Entertainment Weekly

But Nicholson's new one, Vox, is about s-e-x, and the book is being pumped up as a billowing literary scandal — ''The most sexually provocative novel of our time,'' according to his publisher — because of its premise: It's a novel in the form of a telephone conversation between a man and a wo...

Feb 07 1992 | Read Full Review of Vox

London Review of Books

By the end of the novel he has done no more than ‘broken a shoelace, chatted with Tina, urinated successfully in a corporate setting, washed my face, eaten half a bag of popcorn, bought a new set of shoelaces, eaten a hot dog and a cookie with some milk’.

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Reader Rating for Vox
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