Voyager by StephenJ. Pyne
Seeking Newer Worlds in the Third Great Age of Discovery

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The Voyager story itself is an amazing one, and Mr. Pyne tells it skillfully. We forget too easily what a gamble the project was. The execution of history's greatest feat of navigation—in which a spacecraft had to be placed within 62 miles of its target at a distance of more than five billion miles—was astonishing...
-WSJ online

Synopsis

A brilliant new account of the Voyager space program-its history, scientific impact, and cultural legacy

Launched in 1977, the two unmanned Voyager spacecraft have completed their Grand Tour to the four outer planets, and they are now on course to become the first man-made objects to exit our solar system. To many, this remarkable achievement is the culmination of a golden age of American planetary exploration, begun in the wake of the 1957 Sputnik launch. More than this, Voyager may be one of the purest expressions of exploration in human history.

For more than five hundred years the West has been powered by the impulse to explore, to push into a wider world. In this highly original book, Stephen Pyne recasts Voyager in the tradition of Magellan, Columbus, Cook, Lewis and Clark, and other landmark explorers. The Renaissance and Enlightenment-the First and Second Ages of Discovery- sent humans across continents and oceans to find new worlds. In the Third Age, expeditions have penetrated the Antarctic ice, reached the floors of the oceans, and traveled to the planets by new means, most spectacularly via semi-autonomous robot. Voyager probes how the themes of motive and reward are stunningly parallel through all three ages. Voyager, which gave us the first breathtaking images of Jupiter and Saturn, changed our sense of our own place in the universe.
 

About StephenJ. Pyne

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STEPHEN J. PYNE is a Regents Professor in the School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University. An award-winning environmental historian, he is the author of Year of the Fires, The Ice, and How the Canyon Became Grand. He is a recipient of the Robert Kirsch Award from the Los Angeles Times. He lives in Glendale, Arizona.
 
Published May 26, 2010 by Penguin Books. 467 pages
Genres: History, Computers & Technology, Science & Math, Education & Reference, Professional & Technical. Non-fiction
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Critic reviews for Voyager
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WSJ online

Above average
Reviewed by GLENN HARLAN REYNOLDS on Jul 20 2010

The Voyager story itself is an amazing one, and Mr. Pyne tells it skillfully. We forget too easily what a gamble the project was. The execution of history's greatest feat of navigation—in which a spacecraft had to be placed within 62 miles of its target at a distance of more than five billion miles—was astonishing...

Read Full Review of Voyager: Seeking Newer Worlds... | See more reviews from WSJ online

WSJ online

Above average
Reviewed by GLENN HARLAN REYNOLDS on Jul 19 2010

The book offers 200 terrific pages on the two unmanned Voyager space probes launched in 1977, their accomplishments—which, astonishingly, continue—and the immense difficulties they overcame....The Voyager story itself is an amazing one, and Mr. Pyne tells it skillfully.

Read Full Review of Voyager: Seeking Newer Worlds... | See more reviews from WSJ online

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