W.E.B. Du Bois by David Levering Lewis
The Fight for Equality and the American Century 1919-1963

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 9 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

The second volume of the Pulitzer Prize--winning biography that The Washington Post hailed as "an engrossing masterpiece"

Charismatic, singularly determined, and controversial, W.E.B. Du Bois was a historian, novelist, editor, sociologist, founder of the NAACP, advocate of women's rights, and the premier architect of the Civil Rights movement. His hypnotic voice thunders out of David Levering Lewis's monumental biography like a locomotive under full steam.

This second volume of what is already a classic work begins with the triumphal return from WWI of African American veterans to the shattering reality of racism and lynching even as America discovers the New Negro of literature and art. In stunning detail, Lewis chronicles the little-known political agenda behind the Harlem Renaissance and Du Bois's relentless fight for equality and justice, including his steadfast refusal to allow whites to interpret the aspirations of black America. Seared by the rejection of terrified liberals and the black bourgeoisie during the Communist witch-hunts, Du Bois ended his days in uncompromising exile in newly independent Ghana. In re-creating the turbulent times in which he lived and fought, Lewis restores the inspiring and famed Du Bois to his central place in American history.

 

About David Levering Lewis

See more books from this Author
David Levering Lewis is a University Professor at New York University. Both volumes of his biography of W. E. B. Du Bois received the Pulitzer Prize. He lives in New York City.
 
Published September 1, 2001 by Henry Holt and Co.. 752 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Political & Social Sciences, War. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for W.E.B. Du Bois

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

Here, he's last seen after a post- WW I congress that called for direct League of Nations supervision of German colonies in Africa, as he himself returns to a society that brutally and methodically excluded ``his people from meaningful citizenship....'' A masterly appreciation of a great ma...

| Read Full Review of W.E.B. Du Bois: The Fight for...

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

Picking up where he left off seven years ago, Lewis (The Race to Fashoda, 1988, etc.) continues his authoritative biography of the African-American intellectual and activist William Edward Burghardt Du Bois (1868-1963).

Jun 24 2010 | Read Full Review of W.E.B. Du Bois: The Fight for...

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

This second (and final) volume of Lewis's critically praised biography of one of the founders of the contemporary black civil rights movement and a champion of human rights around the world is as astu

Oct 02 2000 | Read Full Review of W.E.B. Du Bois: The Fight for...

The Guardian

See more reviews from this publication

In his book The Souls of Black Folk, Du Bois set out to paint a vivid portrait of black people in the decades after emancipation in 1862 - how they lived and who they really were: and thus to enlighten white America - still profoundly attached to the myths of black inferiority - as to the true m...

Feb 22 2003 | Read Full Review of W.E.B. Du Bois: The Fight for...

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

This second (and final) volume of Lewis's critically praised biography of one of the founders of the contemporary black civil rights movement and a champion of human rights around the world is as astute and superbly written as the first.

| Read Full Review of W.E.B. Du Bois: The Fight for...

Publishers Weekly

See more reviews from this publication

Furthermore, Lewis astutely points out the parallel between America's eagerness to impress Europe and African-Americans' eagerness to impress America: using the stage of the world's fair, both groups frankly lobbied for legitimacy as "culturally mature."

| Read Full Review of W.E.B. Du Bois: The Fight for...

Entertainment Weekly

Du Bois, nominated for this year's National Book Award in the biography category, covers the life of the man some call the godfather of the civil rights movement from 1919 to his death in Ghana in 1963.

Nov 10 2000 | Read Full Review of W.E.B. Du Bois: The Fight for...

Review (Barnes & Noble)

Biographer David Levering Lewis writes that Du Bois "attempted virtually every possible solution to the problem of twentieth-century racism—scholarship, propaganda, integration, national self-determination, human rights, cultural and economic separatism, politics, international communism, expatri...

Feb 23 2011 | Read Full Review of W.E.B. Du Bois: The Fight for...

Project MUSE

To be sure, Blum is not the first scholar to contest the antireligious Du Bois, but one would have to have been listening extremely closely to the last twenty years of Du Bois studies to know that a few scholars, here and there, had begun a sympathetic reappraisal of Du Bois's relationship to rel...

| Read Full Review of W.E.B. Du Bois: The Fight for...

Reader Rating for W.E.B. Du Bois
87%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 10 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×