Waiting for the Barbarians by Daniel Mendelsohn
Essays from the Classics to Pop Culture (New York Review Collections)

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It is a supremely entertaining book. To read it is to sit next a fabulous dinner guest whose comments contain a devastating truth.
-Toronto Star

Synopsis

FINALIST FOR THE NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD
AND THE PEN ART OF THE ESSAY AWARD

Over the past decade and a half, Daniel Mendelsohn’s reviews for The New York Review of BooksThe New Yorker, and The New York Times Book Review have earned him a reputation as “one of the greatest critics of our time” (Poets & Writers). In Waiting for the Barbarians, he brings together twenty-four of his recent essays—each one glinting with “verve and sparkle,” “acumen and passion”—on a wide range of subjects, from Avatar to the poems of Arthur Rimbaud, from our inexhaustible fascination with the Titanic to Susan Sontag’s Journals. Trained as a classicist, author of two internationally best-selling memoirs, Mendelsohn moves easily from penetrating considerations of the ways in which the classics continue to make themselves felt in contemporary life and letters (Greek myth in the Spider-Man musical, Anne Carson’s translations of Sappho) to trenchant takes on pop spectacles—none more explosively controversial than his dissection of Mad Men.

Also gathered here are essays devoted to the art of fiction, from Jonathan Littell’s Holocaust blockbuster The Kindly Ones to forgotten gems like the novels of Theodor Fontane. In a final section, “Private Lives,” prefaced by Mendelsohn’sNew Yorker essay on fake memoirs, he considers the lives and work of writers as disparate as Leo Lerman, Noël Coward, and Jonathan Franzen. Waiting for the Barbarians once again demonstrates that Mendelsohn’s “sweep as a cultural critic is as impressive as his depth.”
 

About Daniel Mendelsohn

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Daniel Mendelsohn's reviews and essays on literary and cultural subjects appear frequently in The New York Review of Books andThe New Yorker. His books include a memoir, The Elusive Embrace, a Los Angeles Times Best Book of the Year; the international best seller The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million; an acclaimed translation of the works of C. P. Cavafy; and a previous collection of essays, How Beautiful It Is and How Easily It Can Be Broken. He teaches at Bard College.
 
Published October 16, 2012 by New York Review Books. 441 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction. Non-fiction
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Critic reviews for Waiting for the Barbarians
All: 2 | Positive: 2 | Negative: 0

Guardian

Above average
Reviewed by Christopher Bray on Jan 06 2013

He is a scrumptious stylist, and what he lacks in wit he makes up for with a wide-angled depth-of-field. He writes better movie criticism than most movie critics, ...and better literary criticism than just about anyone.

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Toronto Star

Excellent
Reviewed by John Freeman on Oct 12 2012

It is a supremely entertaining book. To read it is to sit next a fabulous dinner guest whose comments contain a devastating truth.

Read Full Review of Waiting for the Barbarians: E... | See more reviews from Toronto Star

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