Walking with the Comrades by Arundhati Roy

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Synopsis

From the award-winning author of The God of Small Things comes a searing frontline exposé of brutal repression in India

In her latest book, internationally renowned author Arundhati Roy draws on her unprecedented access to a little-known rebel movement in India to pen a work full of earth-shattering revelations. Deep in the forests, under the pretense of battling Maoist guerillas, the Indian government is waging a vicious total war against its own citizens-a war undocumented by a weak domestic press and fostered by corporations eager to exploit the rare minerals buried in tribal lands. Roy takes readers to the unseen front lines of this ongoing battle, chronicling her months spent living with the rebel guerillas in the forests. In documenting their local struggles, Roy addresses the much larger question of whether global capitalism will tolerate any societies existing outside of its colossal control.

 

About Arundhati Roy

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Suzanna Arundhati Roy, 1961 - Suzanna Roy was born November 24, 1961. Her parents divorced and she lived with her mother Mary Roy, a social activist, in Aymanam. Her mother ran an informal school named Corpus Christi and it was there Roy developed her intellectual abilities, free from the rules of formal education. At the age of 16, she left home and lived on her own in a squatter's colony in Delhi. She went six years without seeing her mother. She attended Delhi School of Architecture where she met and married fellow student Gerard Da Cunha. Neither had a great interest in architecture so they quit school and went to Goa. They stayed there for seven months and returned broke. Their marriage lasted only four years. Roy had taken a job at the National Institute of Urban Affairs and, while cycling down a road; film director Pradeep Krishen offered her a small role as a tribal bimbo in Massey Saab. She then received a scholarship to study the restoration of monuments in Italy. During her eight months in Italy, she realized she was a writer. Now married to Krishen, they planned a 26-episode television epic called Banyan Tree. They didn't shoot enough footage for more than four episodes so the serial was scrapped. She wrote the screenplay for the film In Which Annie Gives It Those Ones and Electric Moon. Her next piece caused controversy. It was an article that criticized Shekar Kapur's film Bandit Queen, which was about Phoolan Devi. She accused Kapur of misrepresenting Devi and it eventually became a court case. Afterwards, finished with film, she concentrated on her writing, which became the novel "A God of Small Things." It is based on what it was like growing up in Kerala. The novel contains mild eroticism and again, controversy found Roy having a public interest petition filed to remove the last chapter because of the description of a sexual act. It took Roy five years to write "A God of Small Things" and was released April 4, 1997 in Delhi. It received the Booker prize in London in 1997 and has topped the best-seller lists around the world. Roy is the first non-expatriate Indian author and the first Indian woman to win the Booker prize.
 
Published October 25, 2011 by Penguin Books. 240 pages
Genres: Business & Economics, History, Political & Social Sciences, Travel. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Walking with the Comrades

Kirkus Reviews

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In a well-documented indictment, investigative journalist Roy (Listening to Grasshoppers: Field Notes on Democracy, 2009, etc.) presents the case against the Indian government’s murderous policies toward the country’s tribal population.

Sep 01 2011 | Read Full Review of Walking with the Comrades

Publishers Weekly

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While acknowledging the Maoism’s “problematic past” and acknowledging atrocities on both sides, Roy sees little alternative beyond armed struggle for these people facing aggressive displacement and dispossession by a corporate-government system of exploitation—often operating in tandem wi...

Sep 19 2011 | Read Full Review of Walking with the Comrades

BC Books

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My immediate reaction upon completing Arundhati Roy's Walking With The Comrades was a sense of sadne...

Jan 02 2012 | Read Full Review of Walking with the Comrades

BC Books

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If you are simply an Indian citizen who questions or fights the system in any way, whether for better pay or food or the simple right to keep your land in the face of a corporation wanting to strip mine it for the minerals that lie beneath the bones of generations of your ancestors, you are going...

Jan 02 2012 | Read Full Review of Walking with the Comrades

Kirkus Reviews

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Reality becomes riveting reading in investigative journalist Arundhati Roy’s Walking With the Comrades, a behind-the-scenes account of the Indian government’s “murderous polices toward the country’s tribal population.” Roy relates the stories behind India’s tribal people and what they’ve suffered...

Oct 25 2011 | Read Full Review of Walking with the Comrades

The Paris Review

“Here in the forests of Dantewada [in central India],” she writes, “a battle rages for the soul of India.” That article forms the centerpiece of her new collection, Walking with the Comrades , from Penguin Books;

Nov 01 2011 | Read Full Review of Walking with the Comrades

The Paris Review

It lives low down on the ground, with its arms around the people who go to battle every day to protect their forests, their mountains and their rivers because they know that the forests, the mountains and the rivers protect them.” I always find it interesting that when you’re with people wh...

Nov 01 2011 | Read Full Review of Walking with the Comrades

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