Way Things Work by David Macaulay

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Synopsis

What really makes the things around us tick? Did you know that the principle behind the zip fastener also governed the building of the pyramids? Or that the dentist's drill is a direct descendant of the first windmill? The inner workings of hundreds of machines and devices are explained in this fun, colourful and unique look at technology through time.
 

About David Macaulay

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David Macaulay is an award-winning author and illustrator whose books have sold millions of copies in the United States alone, and his work has been translated into a dozen languages. Macaulay has garnered numerous awards including the Caldecott Medal and Honor Awards, the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award, the Christopher Award, an American Institute of Architects Medal, and the Washington Post-Children's Book Guild Nonfiction Award. In 2006, he was the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship, given "to encourage people of outstanding talent to pursue their own creative, intellectual, and professional inclinations." Superb design, magnificent illustrations, and clearly presented information distinguish all of his books. David Macaulay lives with his family in Vermont.
 
Published May 6, 2004 by Dorling Kindersley Publishers Ltd. 400 pages
Genres: Education & Reference, Young Adult.

Unrated Critic Reviews for Way Things Work

Kirkus Reviews

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In the same style as The Way Things Work (1988), lively, vivid colored-pencil illustrations accompany a very detailed text explaining the design and function of the human body.

Oct 07 2008 | Read Full Review of Way Things Work

Kirkus Reviews

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Pub Date: Oct. 1st, 1988 ISBN: 1405302380 Page count: 4...

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Kirkus Reviews

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An astonishing tour-de-force, three years in the making, by the architect-turned-author who has given us Cathedral and City.

Oct 27 2011 | Read Full Review of Way Things Work

The New York Times

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(Ages 10 and up) Macaulay, the author of the immensely successful book “The Way Things Work” and other explanatory epics, has shown a great affection for solidity, drawing and describing cathedrals and castles, mills and pyramids in loving detail.

Nov 07 2008 | Read Full Review of Way Things Work

Publishers Weekly

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A Caldecott Medalist and MacArthur Fellow, perhaps best known for his pithily written, illuminatingly illustrated The Way Things Work, Macaulay has devoted himself for years to this illustrated guide aimed at demystifying the workings of the human body.

Oct 27 2008 | Read Full Review of Way Things Work

Entertainment Weekly

A spin-off of David Macaulay's 1988 best-selling book, The Way Things Work 2.0 succeeds as a multimedia conversion but doesn't quite deliver on its title's promise.

Oct 25 1996 | Read Full Review of Way Things Work

Review (Barnes & Noble)

And just like Macaulay with his drawings, Baker, naïvely eager yet wise, employs his precise and evocative words to cherish and dissect, illuminate and interpret, gild and strip down things common and uncommon in such a manner that we appreciate what a splendid creation we inhabit.

Sep 03 2012 | Read Full Review of Way Things Work

KidsReads

This cool and very interactive package explains science and technology in a fun way that's easy to understand.

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Shelf Awareness

We are seeing locations that we thought would happen falling off."--Joe Lombardi, CFO of Barnes & Noble, at a Goldman Sachs conference, reported by CoStar Group, discussing why the company has lowered its estimate of new store openings next year to a range of 20-25 from 30-35.

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Shelf Awareness

The author updates his revolutionary The Way Things Work (also the basis for the PBS documentary of the same name), adding a fifth section, “The Digital Domain.” Just as Macaulay used an amused woolly mammoth to explain the ins and outs of concepts such as “The Mechanics of Movement” (inclined pl...

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