Wayfaring at Waverly in Silver Lake by James McCourt

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The beyond-great Hollywood star returns in seven pyrotechnic tales that become—somehow—a family saga spread over seventeen years.

Wayfaring at Waverly in Silver Lake encompasses friends, relations, and some passersby—as James McCourt cocks a cast eye on the seven deadly sins. Some samples . . .

In a story evoking pride, fountainhead of the other deadly sins, Hollywood star Kaye Wayfaring, semiretired now atop the Silver Lake Hills, like Marion Davis at San Simeon, is at home during the 1984 Olympics, contemplating the translucent Norma Jean (“Nobody ever went at lines the way she did”), while over at the studio, her colleagues review the highlights of her career, culminating in her scandalous, headline-grabbing Oscar snub.

Lust is represented by Kaye, now back in business on location in Ireland, starring as the wanton Irish pirate queen, Granuaile. Kaye is sheathed in the part, waiting for the light, in County Donegal, balancing visions of sacred and profane love, during the first (and always lustful) day of principal photography.

Gluttony is personified by Kaye Wayfaring’s son, Tristan, in the throes of adolescent meltdown, telling his beloved uncle the demented tale of his cross-country bus trip, forced landing, and rescue by south-of-L.A. beach bums, as he floats in and out of consciousness.

And sin itself, as in “sinfully delicious,” is exemplified by James McCourt’s new book, Wayfaring at Waverly in Silver Lake, from beginning to end.

About James McCourt

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James McCourt was born in New York City and was educated at Manhattan College, New York University, and the Yale School of Drama. His stories have appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, Grand Street, and The Yale Review. He lives in New York City, East Hampton, Washington, D.C., and Ireland.
Published June 25, 2002 by Knopf. 336 pages
Genres: Literature & Fiction, Biographies & Memoirs, Arts & Photography. Fiction

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