We Won't See Auschwitz by Jeremie Dres

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Simple, pared-down b&w visuals are a good match for the subject matter, and the more active and emotionally resonant scenes, like the one describing the discovery of the grave sites of the brothers’ ancestors, are far superior to those featuring talking heads, which make up the bulk of the book.
-Publishers Weekly

Synopsis

  After their grandmother’s death, Jérémie and his brother attempt to learn more about their family’s Jewish-Polish roots. But Jérémie is less interested in how the Holocaust affected his family and more interested in understanding what it means to be Jewish and Polish in today’s world. They decide not to do the Holocaust trail—they won’t go to Auschwitz—but instead go to Zelechów, the village where their grandfather was born; Warsaw, their grandmother’s hometown; and Kraków, the city that hosts Europe’s largest festival of Jewish culture. In their quest for identity, they gradually put together the pieces of their family history, while at the same time discovering a country still affected by its past and a culture greater than themselves.

Praise for We Won't See Auschwitz:

“A beautifully illustrated document of two Jewish brothers who visit Poland seeking their cultural heritage.” —Shelf Awareness
 
 

About Jeremie Dres

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Jérémie Dres lives in Paris, France. This is his first graphic novel.
 
Published September 24, 2013 by SelfMadeHero. 208 pages
Genres: Comics & Graphic Novels, Travel.
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Critic reviews for We Won't See Auschwitz
All: 2 | Positive: 1 | Negative: 1

Guardian

Good
Reviewed by Rachel Cooke on Dec 01 2012

Jérémie Dres brings universal appeal to the story of a road trip to discover his own family's Polish-Jewish roots.

Read Full Review of We Won't See Auschwitz | See more reviews from Guardian

Publishers Weekly

Above average
on Jul 22 2013

Simple, pared-down b&w visuals are a good match for the subject matter, and the more active and emotionally resonant scenes, like the one describing the discovery of the grave sites of the brothers’ ancestors, are far superior to those featuring talking heads, which make up the bulk of the book.

Read Full Review of We Won't See Auschwitz | See more reviews from Publishers Weekly

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