White Coat by Ellen L. Rothman
Becoming A Doctor At Harvard Medical School

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Synopsis

In White Coat, Ellen Rothman offers a vivid account of her four years at one of the best medical schools in the country, and opens the infamously closed door between patient and doctor. Touching on today's most important medical issues -- such as HMOs, AIDS, and assisted suicide -- the author navigates her way through despair, exhilaration, and a lot of exhaustion in Harvard's classrooms and Boston's hospitals to earn the indisputable title to which we entrust our lives.

With a thoughtful, candid voice, Rothman writes about a wide range of experiences -- from a dream about holding the hand of a cadaver she had dissected to the acute embarrassment she felt when asking patients about their sexual histories. She shares her horror at treating a patient with a flesh-eating skin infection, the anxiety of being "pimped" by doctors for information (when doctors quiz students on anatomy and medicine), as well as the ultimate reward of making the transformation and of earning a doctor's white coat.

For readers of Perri Klass, Richard Selzer, and the millions of fans of ER, White Coat is a fascinating account of one woman's journey through school and into the high-stakes drama of the medical world.

In White Coat, Ellen Rothman offers a vivid account of her four years at one of the best medical schools in the country, and opens the infamously closed door between patient and doctor. Touching on today's most important medical issues -- such as HMOs, AIDS, and assisted suicide -- the author navigates her way through despair, exhilaration, and a lot of exhaustion in Harvard's classrooms and Boston's hospitals to earn the indisputable title to which we entrust our lives.

With a thoughtful, candid voice, Rothman writes about a wide range of experiences -- from a dream about holding the hand of a cadaver she had dissected to the acute embarrassment she felt when asking patients about their sexual histories. She shares her horror at treating a patient with a flesh-eating skin infection, the anxiety of being "pimped" by doctors for information (when doctors quiz students on anatomy and medicine), as well as the ultimate reward of making the transformation and of earning a doctor's white coat.

For readers of Perri Klass, Richard Selzer, and the millions of fans of ER, White Coat is a fascinating account of one woman's journey through school and into the high-stakes drama of the medical world.

 

About Ellen L. Rothman

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Ellen Lerner Rothman, M.D., lives with her husband, Carlos Lerner, in Brookline, Massachusetts. She is currently doing her residency in the Boston Combined Pediatrics Program at Boston Children's Hospital and Boston City Hospital. This is her first book. Ellen Lerner Rothman, M.D., lives with her husband, Carlos Lerner, in Brookline, Massachusetts. She is currently doing her residency in the Boston Combined Pediatrics Program at Boston Children's Hospital and Boston City Hospital. This is her first book.
 
Published March 17, 1999 by William Morrow. 352 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Health, Fitness & Dieting, Education & Reference, Professional & Technical. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for White Coat

Kirkus Reviews

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A medical student’s thoughtful and revealing chronicle of growing into the white coat of a doctor under Harvard Medical School’s New Pathway system, beginning with day one of orientation and ending with graduation four years later.

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Publishers Weekly

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When Rothman donned her fresh white coat on her first day of orientation at Harvard Medical School, she assumed a complex new identity. To patients, the white coat meant medical authority, whereas to

Jan 04 1999 | Read Full Review of White Coat: Becoming A Doctor...

Publishers Weekly

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To patients, the white coat meant medical authority, whereas to Rothman it represented ""a power that I was not ready to accept."" Written with admirable candor and insight, her account of how she grew into her white coat during the four-year program will interest the mix of general and professio...

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