Winter by Karl Ove Knausgaard

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As I read “Winter” I wondered whether its author had grown bored by his facility with very long prose; whether he wished to elude being pigeonholed as a certain type of writer...perhaps I should be less judgmental of an artist who tries new things and works against his natural style.
-NY Times

Synopsis

The second volume in his autobiographical quartet based on the seasons, Winter is an achingly beautiful collection of daily meditations and letters addressed directly to Knaugsaard's unborn daughter

2 December - It is strange that you exist, but that you don't know anything about what the world looks like. It's strange that there is a first time to see the sky, a first time to see the sun, a first time to feel the air against one's skin. It's strange that there is a first time to see a face, a tree, a lamp, pajamas, a shoe. In my life it almost never happens anymore. But soon it will. In just a few months, I will see you for the first time.

In Winter, we rejoin the great Karl Ove Knausgaard as he waits for the birth of his daughter. In preparation for her arrival, he takes stock of the world, seeing it as if for the first time. In his inimitably sensitive style, he writes about the moon, water, messiness, owls, birthdays--to name just a handful of his subjects. These oh-so-familiar objects and ideas he fills with new meaning, taking nothing for granted or as given. New life is on the horizon, but the earth is also in hibernation, waiting for the warmer weather to return, and so a contradictory melancholy inflects his gaze.

Startling, compassionate, and exquisitely beautiful, Knausgaard's writing is like nothing else. Somehow, he shows the world as it really is, at once mundane and sublime.
 

About Karl Ove Knausgaard

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Karl Ove Knausgaard was born in Oslo in 1968. His first novel, Out of the World, was published in 1998 and won the Norwegian Critics Literary Prize for Fiction—the first time a debut had won that award. His second novel, A Time for Everything, came out six years later, won multiple prestigious prizes, and was named one of the 25 Best Books of the Last 25 Years by Norway’s major newspaper; it was his first book to be translated into English (“Strange and marvelous,” said The New York Review of Books). With the publication of the first volume of My Struggle in 2009, he became a household name in Norway. He now lives in Österlen in rural Sweden with his wife and their three children.
 
Published January 23, 2018 by Penguin Press. 267 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Nature & Wildlife, Literature & Fiction, Science & Math. Non-fiction
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NY Times

Above average
Reviewed by Sarah Manguso on Jan 18 2018

As I read “Winter” I wondered whether its author had grown bored by his facility with very long prose; whether he wished to elude being pigeonholed as a certain type of writer...perhaps I should be less judgmental of an artist who tries new things and works against his natural style.

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