Women's Rights Emerges Within the Anti-Slavery Movement, 1830-1870 by Kathryn Kish Sklar
A Brief History with Documents (Bedford Series in History & Culture)

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Synopsis

Combining documents with an interpretive essay, this book is the first to offer a much-needed guide to the emergence of the women's rights movement within the anti-slavery activism of the 1830s. A 60-page introductory essay traces the cause of women's rights from Angelina and Sarah Grimké's campaign against slavery through the development of a full-fledged women's rights movement in the 1840s and 1850s. A rich collection of over 50 documents includes diary entries, letters, and speeches from the Grimkés, Maria Stewart, Lucretia Mott, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Theodore Weld, Frances Harper, Sojourner Truth, and others.
 

About Kathryn Kish Sklar

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Kathryn Kish Sklar is at SUNY Binghamton.
 
Published March 24, 2000 by Bedford/St. Martin's. 216 pages
Genres: History, Political & Social Sciences, War, Gay & Lesbian. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Women's Rights Emerges Within the Anti-Slavery Movement, 1830-1870

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An essential work for anyone interested in the early days of abolitionism and the women's movement in North America.

Jul 18 2000 | Read Full Review of Women's Rights Emerges Within...

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would be a violation of our fundamental principle that man and woman are created equal and have the same duties and the same responsibilities as moral beings.” The 54 pieces collected here trace the gradual development of ideas about women’s rights, beginning with Angelina and Sarah, the growing ...

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