Woody Allen on Woody Allen by Woody Allen
In Conversation With Stig Bjorkman

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Synopsis

A unique self-portrait of the filmmaker that offers the most candid and revealing account to date of his life and work. In a series of rare, in-depth interviews, Allen brings us onto the sets and behind the scenes of all his films. In discussing his accomplishments, Allen shares his inspirations, anxieties, memories and opinions, both personal and professional. Photographs.
 

About Woody Allen

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Allen's favorite personality-the bemused neurotic, the perpetual worrywart, the born loser-dominates his plays, his movies, and his essays. A native New Yorker, Allen attended local schools and despised them, turning early to essay writing as a way to cope with his Since his apprenticeship, writing gags for comedians such as Sid Caesar and Garry Moore, the image he projects-of a "nebbish from Brooklyn"-has developed into a personal metaphor of life as a concentration camp from which no one escapes alive. Allen wants to be funny, but isn't afraid to be serious either-even at the same time. His film Annie Hall, co-written with Marshall Brickman and winner of four Academy Awards, was a subtle, dramatic development of the contemporary fears and insecurities of American life. In her review of Love and Death, Judith Christ wrote that Allen was more interested in the character rather than the cartoon, the situation rather than the set-up, and the underlying madness rather than the surface craziness. Later Allen films, such as Crimes and Misdemeanors or Husbands and Wives, take on a far more somber and philosophic tone, which has delighted some critics and appalled others. In Allen's essays and fiction reprinted from the New Yorker, Getting Even New Yorker, (1971), Without Feathers (1975), and Side Effects (1980), the situations and characters don't just speak to us, they are us. Stig Bjorkman is the editor of "Bergman on Bergman" and "Woody Allen on Woody Allen," and has directed the documentaries "Tranceformer: A Portrait of Lars von Trier" and "I Am Curious, Film,"
 
Published November 1, 1994 by Grove Pr. 288 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, Humor & Entertainment, Arts & Photography. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Woody Allen on Woody Allen

Kirkus Reviews

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Get two filmmakers together to talk about work and the result should be interesting, especially if one of them--Woody Allen- -seldom sits for long interviews.

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Publishers Weekly

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when, in a piece making fun of the New York Times science page, ""Strung Out,"" Allen notes that ""to a man standing on the shore, time passes quicker than to a man on a boat - especially if the man on the boat is with his wife""-we groan.

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Publishers Weekly

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Interwoven with film clips and photographs, plus paintings by Marc Chagall, Edvard Munch, Paul Klee, Grant Wood and others, the selections are loosely organized around Allen's abiding themes and obsessions--his childhood, love's highs and lows, intellectuals' pretensions, psychoanalysis, New York...

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Publishers Weekly

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He defends his portrayals of blacks against criticism from African American groups that he casts them only as menial characters, explains that his temperament determines the length of his films (``Scorsese's body rhythm is longer'') and knocks American movie reviewers who ``gush tremendously over...

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Entertainment Weekly

Woody Allen on the films of Woody Allen, that is.

Jan 27 1995 | Read Full Review of Woody Allen on Woody Allen: I...

The Independent

And then, little by little, I wounded it, in writing, in casting, in shooting, in editing, in mixing it, I want to get rid of it, I don't want to see it again.' Because of this, Woody says he rarely watches his films, which is perhaps not something you should learn near the end of a book in whi...

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