World Fire by Stephen J. Pyne
The Culture of Fire on Earth

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Synopsis

Linking the evolution of humankind to humans' control over fire, the author of Burning Bush examines the emerging geography of global fire, the environmental impact of fire in nature, and the role of fire in the regeneration of the natural world.
 

About Stephen J. Pyne

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Stephen J. Pyne is a professor at Arizona State University. The author of ten acclaimed books on environmental history, he won the 1995 "Los Angeles Times'" Robert Kirsch Award for his career contribution to arts & letters. He lives in Glendale, Arizona.
 
Published March 1, 1995 by Henry Holt & Co. 379 pages
Genres: Political & Social Sciences, Nature & Wildlife, Science & Math, History. Non-fiction

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Kirkus Reviews

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Pyne, who himself has worked as a firefighter, has harsh words for the US fire exclusion policies in general, and for management of fire in the national parks, especially the massive 1988 Yellowstone wildfire, which was allowed to burn because it was set by lightning and was therefore considered ...

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Publishers Weekly

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Over the millennia, contends Pyne, humans used fire to sustain slash-and-burn agriculture, and fires set judiciously or occurring spontaneously benefited ecosystems by exposing land to more sunlight,

May 29 1995 | Read Full Review of World Fire: The Culture of Fi...

Publishers Weekly

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 Father and daughter historians Lydia Pyne (Drexel University) and Stephen Pyne (Year of the Fires) argue that, in the 19th century, with the development of the notion of the Pleistocene era—from 2.6 million years ago to about 10,000–12,000 years ago, toward the end of which Homo sapiens eme...

Mar 26 2012 | Read Full Review of World Fire: The Culture of Fi...

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