World War D. The Case against prohibitionism, roadmap to controlled re-legalization by Jeffrey Dhywood

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Synopsis

World War-D revolves around the simple but fundamental question: Are organized societies capable and willing to manage and control psychoactive substances, instead of leaving it to organized crime? The book clearly demonstrates that prohibition is the worst possible form of control as it gives control of the prohibited substances to powerful criminal organizations. The criminalization of what is essentially a health issue turns otherwise harmless citizens into outcasts and criminals once they graduate from the university in crime that is the prison system, with drastically reduced social prospects. Forty years into this hopeless war, drugs are cheaper, more potent and more available than ever. Powerful drug trafficking organizations are destabilizing vast regions of the world, from Central America, to West Africa, to Central Asia. Isn t it time to stop this madness? Aren t there better options? When will our lawmakers come to their senses? World War-D is divided in 3 sections. The first section covers prohibitionism, its historical and ideological origin, its human and social costs and unintended consequences, with a chapter dedicated to the structure and evolution of the illegal drugs marketplace. The second section explains the basic workings of the brain and how psychoactive substances act within the brain, and reviews the major psychoactives substances, from alcohol, tobacco and psychopharmaceuticals to illegal drugs. The third section presents a critical analysis of prohibitionism with sensible and practical alternatives to the current failed drug policies. World War-D lays out a concrete, pragmatic, and realistic roadmap to global re-legalization founded on a multi-tiered legalize, tax, control, prevent, treat, and educate approach with practical and efficient mechanisms to manage and minimize societal costs. World War-D is the most articulate and comprehensive indictment of prohibitionism and the War on Drugs, with a realistic and pragmatic pathway to controlled legalization. Far from giving up and far from an endorsement, controlled legalization would be finally growing up; being realistic instead of being in denial; being in control instead of leaving control to the underworld. It would abolish the current regime of socialization of costs and privatization of profits to criminal enterprises, depriving them of their main source of income and making our world a safer place. At a time when the current and two former US presidents have admittedly indulged, as have politicians of all stripes from Al Gore to Newt Gingrich and Sarah Palin and over 50% of the adult US population, the credibility tipping point of the War on Drugs propaganda has long been passed. All that appears to be missing is the political courage to admit failure and move on to more realistic and efficient policies. As the wave of support for drug reform keeps growing throughout the world, from church groups to retired law enforcement, to the NAACP, to Kofi Annan, George Shultz, Paul Volcker, and a string of former and sitting Latin American and European head of states, the concept of legalization is rapidly moving from fringe lunacy to the mainstream. Yet, to this day, no book has addressed the issue in such an analytic, global and comprehensive way. No matter where you stand on drug prohibition, world War-D will give you a much clearer understanding of the issue in all of its multi-faceted complexity and with a global perspective. The book will prove invaluable to policy-makers, activists and concerned citizens alike.
 

About Jeffrey Dhywood

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Published October 19, 2011 by Columbia Communications Inc. 451 pages
Genres: Political & Social Sciences.

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