World Without Fish by Mark Kurlansky

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Synopsis

Mark Kurlansky, beloved award-winning and bestselling author, offers a riveting, uniquely illustrated, narrative nonfiction account for kids about what’s happening to fish, the oceans, and our environment, and what kids can do about it.

World Without Fish has been praised as “urgent” (Publishers Weekly) and “a wonderfully fast-paced and engaging primer on the key questions surrounding fish and the sea” (Paul Greenberg, author of Four Fish). It has also been included in the New York State Expeditionary Learning English Language Arts Curriculum.

Written by a master storyteller, World Without Fish connects all the dots—biology, economics, evolution, politics, climate, history, culture, food, and nutrition—in a way that kids can really understand. It describes how the fish we most commonly eat, including tuna, salmon, cod, and swordfish, could disappear within 50 years, and the domino effect it would have—oceans teeming with jellyfish and turning pinkish orange from algal blooms; seabirds disappearing, then reptiles, then mammals. It describes the back-and-forth dynamic of fishermen and scientists. It covers the effects of industrialized fishing, and how bottom-dragging nets are turning the ocean floor into a desert.

The answer? Support sustainable fishing. World Without Fish tells kids exactly what they can do: Find out where those fish sticks come from. Tell your parents what’s good to buy, and what’s not. Ask the waiter if the fish on the menu is line-caught And follow simple rules: Use less plastic, and never eat endangered fish like bluefin tuna.

Interwoven with the book is a graphic novel. Each beautifully illustrated chapter opener links to form a larger fictional story that complements the text. Hand in hand, they create a Silent Spring for a new generation.

 
 

About Mark Kurlansky

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Mark Kurlansky is the author of The Basque History of the World, the New York Times bestseller Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World (among the New York Public Library's Best Books of the Year in 1998), as well as A Chosen Few: The Resurrection of European Jewry; A Continent of Islands: Searching for the Caribbean Destiny, and several acclaimed works of short fiction and journalism about the Caribbean. He spent seven years as the Caribbean correspondent for the Chicago Tribune. He lives in New York City. Frank Stockton is an artist and illustrator whose work has appeared in Esquire, The New Yorker, The New York Times, and Rolling Stone. He lives in Brooklyn, New York.
 
Published January 1, 2011 by New York: Workman Publishing Company. 192 pages
Genres: Health, Fitness & Dieting, Nature & Wildlife, Children's Books, Education & Reference.

Unrated Critic Reviews for World Without Fish

Kirkus Reviews

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This is juxtaposed against nonfiction chapters with topics including types of fishing equipment and the damage each causes, a history of the destruction of the cod and its consequences, the international politics of the fishing industry and the effects of pollution and global warming.

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The Guardian

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You've written about our dwindling fish stocks before, but why did you choose to write a book – World Without Fish – aimed at children?

Apr 16 2011 | Read Full Review of World Without Fish

Publishers Weekly

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Kurlansky traces the history of salt's influences from prehistoric China and ancient Africa (in Egypt they made mummies using salt) to Europe (in 12th-century Provence, France, salt merchants built "a system of solar evaporation ponds") and the Americas, through chapters with intriguing titles li...

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Publishers Weekly

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In this marvelous work of cultural history and appreciation, Kurlansky traces Basque history from pre-Roman times, when Basques worked as the mercenaries of Carthage, to the region's recent renaissance in language and arts.

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Publishers Weekly

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As Kurlansky (Cod , Salt , etc.) has made the phrase "changed the world" a necessary component of subtitles for books about mundane objects, his choice to focus on a year that so "rocked" the world is appropriate.

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Publishers Weekly

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Kurlansky (The Cod's Tale) offers an urgent account of the problems that threaten the world's oceans and could result in the commercial extinction of key species of fish in the next 50 years. It's an

Mar 21 2011 | Read Full Review of World Without Fish

Oregon Live

The "world without fish" that Mark Kurlansky envisions may be hard to imagine, given what he calls our "enduring misconception" about nature's bounty.

Apr 30 2011 | Read Full Review of World Without Fish

Tampa Bay Times

World Without Fish also explains that there is no single, simple solution to this problem (even halting all fishing wouldn't do it), but that there are things everyone, including kids, can do to turn the tide.

May 14 2011 | Read Full Review of World Without Fish

Jacksonville.com

The underlined section is larger and in red.) Interspersed throughout is an 11-page graphic novel that reinforces Kurlansky's message: "Most of the fish we commonly eat, most of the fish we know, could be gone in the next fifty years."

May 14 2011 | Read Full Review of World Without Fish

Shelf Awareness

During a recent event at Flyleaf Books, Chapel Hill, N.C., celebrating the publication of Sara Foster's Southern Kitchen (Clarkson Potter), Foster and co-author Tema Larter (seated) shared the fun with friends, including author Frances Mayes and her husband, Ed Kleinschmidt--the pranksters in the...

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Shelf Awareness

This beautifully designed book by the author of the popular Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World will inspire your child (and the rest of us) to take steps to save the fish—and our world.

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truthdig

“I don’t think any film has ever depicted a world so awful with such conviction,” Gabriel Winslow-Yost writes of “Hard to Be a God” in The New York Review of Books.

Feb 01 2015 | Read Full Review of World Without Fish

http://www.timeoutchicagokids.com

While Secret World balanced its tales of human ignorance and cruelty with happier whale tales, World without Fish exists to shine a light on a very dire picture: how climate change and overfishing of salmon, tuna, cod and other fish could lead to an environmental catastrophe.

Jun 02 2011 | Read Full Review of World Without Fish

Reader Rating for World Without Fish
87%

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