Writing the Thames by Christina Hardyment

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 1 Critic Review

It might be churlish to point out omissions, but mild cavilling is one of the pleasures for the reader of a book such as this. Hardyment’s last word is a generous tribute... More manageable and less mystical, Writing the Thames lies far upstream of that swollen torrent of a book, in calm and sparkling waters.
-Financial Times

Synopsis

From Arthur Conan Doyle to Charles Dickens, Colin Dexter to Kenneth Grahame, writers and artists have often taken inspiration from the Thames. Gathering poetry, artwork, and short excerpts from longer prose, Writing the Thames includes chapters on topics that dominate in literary and artistic depictions of the Thames, from historical events like Julius Caeser’s crossing in 55 BCE and Elizabeth I’s stand against the Spanish at Tilbury to the explorations of the topographers who mapped and drew the river to the many authors, including Thomas More, Francis Bacon, William Morris, and Henry James, who enjoyed riverside retreats. A chapter on boats features the frenetic rowers from Zuleika Dobson, a camping tale from Three Men in a Boat, and the story of William Hogarth’s impulsive five-day trip down the river with four inebriated friends. Some of the best-loved children’s literature has also been inspired by the Thames, including The Wind in the Willows.

Beautifully illustrated with seventy full-color illustrations, this book tells the river’s remarkable story through art, poetry, and prose, while celebrating the writers who helped form its enduring legacy.
 

About Christina Hardyment

See more books from this Author
Christina Hardyment is a writer and journalist. She is the editor of Pleasures of the Table and Pleasures of the Garden and the author of Writing Britain.
 
Published July 15, 2016 by Bodleian Library, University of Oxford. 288 pages
Genres: Political & Social Sciences.
Add Critic Review

Critic reviews for Writing the Thames
All: 1 | Positive: 1 | Negative: 0

Financial Times

Good
Reviewed by Suzi Feay on Apr 29 2016

It might be churlish to point out omissions, but mild cavilling is one of the pleasures for the reader of a book such as this. Hardyment’s last word is a generous tribute... More manageable and less mystical, Writing the Thames lies far upstream of that swollen torrent of a book, in calm and sparkling waters.

Read Full Review of Writing the Thames | See more reviews from Financial Times