Wrong About Japan by Peter Carey
A Father's Journey with His Son

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Synopsis

When Peter Carey offered to take his son to Japan, 12-year-old Charley stipulated no temples or museums. He wanted to see manga, anime, and cool, weird stuff. His father said yes. Out of that bargain comes this enchanting tour of the mansion of Japanese culture, as entered through its garish, brightly lit back door. Guided–and at times judged–by an ineffably strange boy named Takashi, the Careys meet manga artists and anime directors, the meticulous impersonators called “visualists,” and solitary, nerdish otaku. Throughout, the Booker Prize-winning novelist makes observations that are intriguing even when–as his hosts keep politely reminding him–they turn out to be wrong. Funny, surprising, distinguished by its wonderfully nuanced portrait of a father and son thousands of miles from home, Wrong About Japan is a delight.


From the Trade Paperback edition.
 

About Peter Carey

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PETER CAREY is the author of eleven previous novels and has twice received the Booker Prize. His other honors include the Commonwealth Writers' Prize and the Miles Franklin Literary Award. Born in Australia, he has lived in New York City for twenty years.
 
Published July 1, 2009 by Vintage. 176 pages
Genres: History, Political & Social Sciences, Travel. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Wrong About Japan

Kirkus Reviews

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No museums.” Once in Tokyo, though they stay in an old inn and Carey slips in a visit to a Kabuki performance, he essentially concentrates on Charley’s interests, figuring that “we might enter the mansion of Japanese culture through its garish, brightly lit back door.” Perhaps he could learn fro...

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The New York Times

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he very subject of Peter Carey's new book, "Wrong About Japan: A Father's Journey With His Son," can't help but raise all sorts of great (well, at least positive) expectations.

Mar 15 2005 | Read Full Review of Wrong About Japan: A Father's...

The New York Times

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HE novelist Peter Carey, twice the recipient of the prestigious Booker Prize for fiction, heads to Tokyo and returns with this, his second travel book.

Jan 30 2005 | Read Full Review of Wrong About Japan: A Father's...

The Guardian

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Wrong About Japan: A Father's Journey With His Son by Peter Carey 124pp, Faber, £12.99 In his remarkable book The Art of Travel (1855) Charles Darwin's cousin Francis Galton noted that "In Napoleon's retreat, after his campaign in Russia, many a soldier saved or prolonged his life by creeping w...

Jan 22 2005 | Read Full Review of Wrong About Japan: A Father's...

The Guardian

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Wrong about Japan: A Father's Journey with his Son Peter Carey Faber £12.99, pp176 This is an odd, unnecessary little book - an unmemorable memento of a brief trip Peter Carey made to Tokyo two years ago with his pubescent son.

Jan 02 2005 | Read Full Review of Wrong About Japan: A Father's...

Publishers Weekly

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Their guide to Tokyo's cartoon culture was Takashi, a teenager the narrative says Charley met online (yet, as Carey revealed in a newspaper interview, he created the imaginary character of Takashi because the narrative needed conflict, and Carey wanted to avoid "conflict with anybody in real life").

Nov 22 2004 | Read Full Review of Wrong About Japan: A Father's...

Alibi

But since this is Peter Carey, we now have a book, Wrong About Japan, a charmingly comic tale about a father and son's shared experience of cultural confusion in Japan.

Mar 10 2005 | Read Full Review of Wrong About Japan: A Father's...

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