Yemen Chronicle by Steven C. Caton
An Anthropology of War and Mediation

No critic rating

Waiting for minimum critic reviews

See 2 Critic Reviews

unrated

Synopsis

A report like no other from the heart of the Arab Middle East

In 1979, Steven C. Caton went to a remote area of Yemen to do fieldwork on the famous oral poetry of its tribes. The recent hostage crisis in Iran made life perilous for a young American in the Middle East; worse, he was soon embroiled in a dangerous local conflict. Yemen Chronicle is Caton's touchingly candid acount of the extraordinary events that ensued.

One day a neighboring sheikh came angrily to the sanctuary village where Caton lived, claiming that a man there had abducted his daughter and another girl. This was cause for war, and even though the culprit was captured and mediation efforts launched, tribal hostilities simmered for months. A man who was helping to resolve the dispute befriended Caton, showing him how the poems recited by the belligerents were connected to larger Arab conflicts and giving him refuge when the sanctuary was attacked. Then, unexpectedly, Caton himself was arrested and jailed for being an American spy.

It was 2001 before Caton could return toYemen to untangle the story of why he had been imprisoned and what had happened to the missing girls. Placing his contradictory experiences in their full context, Yemen Chronicle is not only an invaluable assessment of classical ethnographic procedures but also a profound meditation on the political, cultural, and sexual components of modern Arab culture.

 

About Steven C. Caton

See more books from this Author
Steven C. Caton, a professor of anthropology at Harvard University and director of its Center for Middle Eastern Studies, is the author of Lawrence of Arabia: A Film's Anthropology. He lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and New York City.
 
Published October 3, 2006 by Hill and Wang. 353 pages
Genres: History, Political & Social Sciences. Non-fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for Yemen Chronicle

Kirkus Reviews

See more reviews from this publication

A season of anthropological fieldwork gone wrong. In this thoughtful memoir, Caton (Anthropology/Harvard Univ.) returns many years later to try to learn why.

May 20 2010 | Read Full Review of Yemen Chronicle: An Anthropol...

There's more to Yemen than current "overheated generalizations," claims Caton (contemporary Arab studies, Harvard) as he offers expert essays on geography, history, politics and government, economy, soc

Aug 01 2013 | Read Full Review of Yemen Chronicle: An Anthropol...

Reader Rating for Yemen Chronicle
100%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 5 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×