You Want Women to Vote, Lizzie Stanton? by Jean Fritz

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Synopsis

Who says women shouldn't speak in public? And why can't they vote?These are questions Elizabeth Cady Stanton grew up asking herself. Her father believed that girls didn't count as much as boys, and her own husband once got so embarrassed when she spoke at a convention that he left town. Luckily Lizziewasn't one to let society stop her from fighting for equality for everyone. And though she didn't live long enough to see women get to vote, our entire country benefited from her fight for women's rights."Fritz?imparts not just a sense of Stanton's accomplishments but a picture of the greater society Stanton strove to change?.Highly entertaining and enlightening." — Publishers Weekly (starred review)"This objective depiction of AStanton's? life and times?makes readers feel invested in her struggle." — School Library Journal (starred review)"An accessible, fascinating portrait." — The Horn Book
 

About Jean Fritz

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Jean Fritz was born on November 16, 1915 in Hankow, China. The only child of missionary parents, she lived in a French compound, attended a British school,and spoke fluent Chinese. She received her A. B. degree in 1937 from Wheaton College and also studied at Columbia University. Fritz has worked as a research assistant, a children's librarian from 1937 to 1941, a teacher for the Board of Cooperative Educational Service, a lecturer, and faculty member at Appalachian State University, from 1980-1982. She also founded the Jean Fritz Writer's Workshops and taught writing from 1961 to 1969. Fritz published her first book, Bunny Hopewell's First Spring, in 1954. Fritz was awarded the Regina Medal by the Catholic Library Association, the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award by the American Library Association, and honored with the Knickerbocker Award for Juvenile Literature, presented by the New York State Library Association for her body of work. Other awards include Outstanding Pennsylvania Author, 1978; Honor Award for Nonfiction, Washington, D.C. Children's Book Guild, 1978-1979; Boston Globe Horn Book Honor Book Award, 1980, for Stonewall; American Book Award nomination, 1981, for Traitor: The Case of Benedict Arnold; Child Study Award and Christopher Award, both 1982; Newbery Honor Book Award, American Book Award and Boston Globe Horn Book Honor Book Award, all 1983, for Homesick: My Own Story; Boston Globe Horn Book Nonfiction Award, 1984, for The Double Life of Pocahontas; and Regina Award, 1985. HUDSON TALBOTT has illustrated many books for children, inclHUDSON TALBOTT has illustrated many books for children, including O'Sullivan Stew: A Tale Cooked Up in Ireland, which heuding O'Sullivan Stew: A Tale Cooked Up in Ireland, which he also wrote, and Leonardo's Horse. He divides his time betwe also wrote, and Leonardo's Horse. He divides his time between New York City and upstate New York. en New York City and upstate New York.
 
Published February 15, 1999 by Puffin. 106 pages
Genres: Biographies & Memoirs, History, Political & Social Sciences, Children's Books, Literature & Fiction. Fiction

Unrated Critic Reviews for You Want Women to Vote, Lizzie Stanton?

Kirkus Reviews

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The early women's rights and suffrage advocate Elizabeth Cady Stanton is the focus of a readable, accessible biography.

| Read Full Review of You Want Women to Vote, Lizzi...

Publishers Weekly

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Fritz maintains her reputation for fresh and lively historical writing with this biography of the 19th-century American feminist Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902), imparting to her readers not just a

Sep 11 1995 | Read Full Review of You Want Women to Vote, Lizzi...

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