Fat, Drunk, and Stupid by Matty Simmons

42%

10 Critic Reviews

Animal House fans will find some anecdotes of interest, but there is barely enough here for a comprehensive magazine article on the making of the classic movie.
-Kirkus

Synopsis

In 1976 the creators of National Lampoon, America’s most popular humor magazine, decided to make a movie. It would be set on a college campus in the 1960s, loosely based on the experiences of Lampoon writers Chris Miller and Harold Ramis and Lampoon editor Doug Kenney. They named it Animal House, in honor of Miller’s fraternity at Dartmouth, where the members had been nicknamed after animals.

Miller, Ramis, and Kenney wrote a film treatment that was rejected and ridiculed by Hollywood studios—until at last Universal Pictures agreed to produce the film, with a budget of $3 million.

A cast was assembled, made up almost completely of unknowns. Stephen Furst, who played Flounder, had been delivering pizzas. Kevin Bacon was a waiter in Manhattan when he was hired to play Chip. Chevy Chase was considered for the role of Otter, but it wound up going to the lesser-known Tim Matheson. John Belushi, for his unforgettable role as Bluto, made $40,000 (the movie’s highest-paid actor).

For four weeks in the fall of 1977, the actors and crew invaded the college town of Eugene, Oregon, forming their own sort of fraternity in the process. The hilarious, unforgettable movie they made wound up earning more than $600 million and became one of America’s most beloved comedy classics. It launched countless careers and paved the way for today’s comedies from directors such as Judd Apatow and Todd Phillips.

Bestselling author Matty Simmons was the founder of National Lampoon and the producer of Animal House. In Fat, Drunk, and Stupid, he draws from exclusive interviews with actors including Karen Allen, Kevin Bacon, Peter Riegert, and Mark Metcalf, director John Landis, fellow producer Ivan Reitman, and other key players—as well as behind-the-scenes photos—to tell the movie’s outrageous story, from its birth in the New York offices of the National Lampoon to writing a script, assembling the perfect cast, the wild weeks of filming, and, ultimately, to the film’s release and megasuccess.

This is a hilarious romp through one of the biggest grossing, most memorable, most frequently quoted, and most celebrated comedies of all time.


 

About Matty Simmons

See more books from this Author
Matty Simmons was the producer of Animal House and founder and CEO of National Lampoon. He has produced nine other films, including the Vacation series, collaborated with such well-known writers as John Hughes and Judd Apatow, been a newspaper reporter and press agent, and written eight books, including several bestsellers. He currently writes for Reader’s Digest and other publications. He lives in Los Angeles.
 
Published April 10, 2012 by St. Martin's Press. 241 pages
Genres: Other, Biographies & Memoirs, Humor & Entertainment. Non-fiction
Add Critic Review

Critic reviews for Fat, Drunk, and Stupid
All: 10 | Positive: 3 | Negative: 7

Kirkus

Below average
Jan 01 2012

Animal House fans will find some anecdotes of interest, but there is barely enough here for a comprehensive magazine article on the making of the classic movie.

Read Full Review of Fat, Drunk, and Stupid | See more reviews from Kirkus

NY Times

Below average
Reviewed by Peter Keepnews on Jun 01 2012

...he writes with pride about his involvement in plans for a Broadway musical version of “Animal House.” I don’t know why anyone would think an all-singing, all-dancing “Animal House” is a good idea.

Read Full Review of Fat, Drunk, and Stupid | See more reviews from NY Times

Wall Street Journal

Below average
Reviewed by Joseph Rago on Apr 14 2012

Mr. Simmons doesn't seem to quite grasp that his achievement couldn't be repeated either.

Read Full Review of Fat, Drunk, and Stupid | See more reviews from Wall Street Journal

AV Club

Below average
Reviewed by Michaelangelo Matos on Apr 02 2012

The point of a book like this one is to answer questions, not to send readers off to Wikipedia to find out what the hell the author is talking about.

Read Full Review of Fat, Drunk, and Stupid | See more reviews from AV Club

The Washington Post

Excellent
Reviewed by David Kirby on Apr 20 2012

while Simmons’s book isn’t a coast-to-coast survey of popular culture in the ’70s, it does offer a unique look at the one movie that, more than any other, told Americans it’s okay to access your inner frat boy.

Read Full Review of Fat, Drunk, and Stupid

PopMatters

Below average
Reviewed by Sylvio Lynch on May 17 2012

But an in-depth critical examination of the script, the plot, the characters, and cinematography of the film, this is not.

Read Full Review of Fat, Drunk, and Stupid

The Miami Herald

Below average
Reviewed by Douglass Daniel on Apr 22 2012

The author approaches his subject like the movie’s producer instead of a writer eager to analyze closely the strengths and weaknesses of the movie, its lore and its legacy.

Read Full Review of Fat, Drunk, and Stupid

Frogen Yozurt

Good
Apr 23 2012

This is a hilarious romp through one of the biggest grossing, most memorable, most frequently quoted, and most celebrated comedies of all time.

Read Full Review of Fat, Drunk, and Stupid

Who's Your Favorite Beatle?

Below average
Reviewed by Bill Miller on Apr 29 2012

You are not going to learn much more from him than you already do about what may always be our generation's most iconic movie.

Read Full Review of Fat, Drunk, and Stupid

National Lampoon

Good
Reviewed by Marty Dundics on Apr 11 2012

If you are a fan of the film, you will love this book.

Read Full Review of Fat, Drunk, and Stupid

Reader Rating for Fat, Drunk, and Stupid
65%

An aggregated and normalized score based on 43 user ratings from iDreamBooks & iTunes


Rate this book!

Add Review
×